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Heirloom Dahlia Bulbs

From America’s Expert Source for Heirloom Flower Bulbs
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THOMAS EDISON, 1929

This velvety classic is still the truest deep purple of all dahlias, a color that photos can’t quite capture but that modern breeders envy. It was “named for the famous Electrical Wizard with his approval,” according to the L.L. Old’s catalog of 1939. Grow it and we think you’ll agree – it’s electrifying! Formal decorative, 6-8”, 3-4’, heat-tolerant, from Holland. Chart, care, and learn more.

SD-05
1/$7
3/$20
5/$31.50
10/$59.50
25/$140

TSUKI YORI NO SHISHA, 1953

The deeply fringed petals of this big, spectacular dahlia give it an otherworldly air, which is fitting since its name means “Messenger from the Moon” (the title of an enormously popular Japanese novel). When we look at it, though, we see Fourth of July sparklers and big shaggy dogs. What will you – or your kids or grandkids – see? Free-blooming, laciniated, 5-8”, 3-4’, from Holland. Chart and care.

SD-62
1/$7
3/$20
5/$31.50
10/$59.50
25/$140

WHITE ASTER, 1879Rarest

This is the world’s oldest surviving garden dahlia. (Do you need to know more?) With fresh green foliage and hundreds of small, ivory globes – each touched in the center with a bit of honey, or sunshine? – it has all the pristine, elemental beauty of a newborn baby. Preserved by a German nursery that has specialized in dahlias for close to a century, it’s a timeless classic. 1-2”, 3-5’, from Holland and New Hampshire. Chart, care, and learn more.

SD-10
1/$8.50
3/$24
5/$38
Almost gone! Limit 5.

WISCONSIN RED, 1910?Rarest

This striking family heirloom with its ruby flowers on dark stems is SO easy to grow and store that it’s been a pass-along plant in Wisconsin since the early 1900s. We got our start from our friend Vytas Virkau who got it from Catherine Becker of Wausaukee who’d been growing it since the 1940s. Then we met Brenda and John Hagman whose family has been passing it down since 1910 or before – or so it seems. Learn more here, or just plant it and join the tradition! Ball, 3”, 4-5’, heat-tolerant, grown for us in Oregon. Chart and care.

SD-63
1/$9.50
3/$27
5/$42.50
10/$80.50
25/$190

YORK AND LANCASTER, 1915?Rarest

The history of this intriguing dahlia is a mystery. One British expert told us it was rediscovered in a chateau garden and dated to 1915. Another said he saw it growing in a rural hamlet near Lyon and it dated to the 1850s. We’ll keep researching its past, but one thing for certain is its garden appeal. Every flower is different. A few open deep red, a few pearly white, but most are an unpredictable mix of both colors – trè intéressant! Ball, 3”, 4-5’, grown for us in Oregon. Chart and care.

SD-61
1/$9.50
3/$27
5/$42.50
10/$80.50
Limit 10, please.

AMBER QUEEN, 1945Web-Only

A warm, pastel amber touched with peach in the center, this WW II-era pompon was raised by Harry Stredwick, winner of the RHS’s Victoria Medal of Honor, whose family introduced their first dahlias way back in the 1890s. Great for bouquets, it blooms early and profusely. Pompon, 2”, 4’, from Oregon. Chart and care. We plan to offer this variety again next spring. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

SD-13 1/$10 3/$28.50 5/$45 10/$85 25/$200 SOLD OUT

ANDRIES’ ORANGE, 1936Rarest

Simple yet extraordinary, this charming dahlia became an instant staff favorite when it first bloomed here – and bloomed and bloomed and bloomed. A clear, companionable orange with 3-4 inch, semi-cactus flowers on wiry stems, it’s a flower arranger’s delight. Its full Flemish name, ‘Andries Oranje As’, honors a Jazz Age liqueur from the small Belgian town of As. 3-5’, reintroduced from the UK National Collection and grown for us now in New Hampshire. Chart and care. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

SD-44 1/$11 3/$31.50 5/$49.50 10/$93.50 25/$220 SOLD OUT

ARTHUR HAMBLEY, 1955Rarest & Web-Only

This big, beautiful dinner-plate dahlia has ruffled petals of soft lavender-pink with a glimmering of gold deep in the center. The great garden writer Henry Mitchell wrote that dinner-plates are like elephants, walruses, and hippos – each “marvelous in itself” – and this is a marvelous pink elephant indeed. Aka ‘A. Hampley’, formal decorative, 6-10”, 4-5’, from Holland. Chart and care. We hope to offer this variety again next spring. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

SD-87 1/$8.50 3/$24 5/$38 10/$72 25/$170 SOLD OUT

BONNE ESPERANCE, 1948Web-Only

Here’s a sweet little classic for pots or the front of a sunny border. Just 12-24 inches tall, ‘Good Hope’ is loaded all summer with 2-3 inch, rosy pink flowers, each a single row of petals around a cheerful yellow button-eye. Nothing could be simpler, or prettier – and the bees will thank you for it, too! From Oregon. Chart and care. We plan to offer this variety again next spring. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

SD-16 1/$7.50 3/$21.50 5/$34 10/$63.50 25/$150 SOLD OUT

CLAIR DE LUNE, 1946Rarest & Web-Only

As elegant and wildflowery as the great ‘Bishop of Llandaff’, this sublimely simple collarette dahlia is named for Debussy’s romantic ode to moonlight. With a single row of soft yellow outer petals, a frilly ruff of white inner petals, and an eye like a harvest moon, it’s strong-growing in the garden and blissful in bouquets. Fern-like green leaves, 3”, 3-4’, heat-tolerant, from New Hampshire. Chart and care. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

SD-25 1/$9 3/$25.50 5/$40.50 10/$76.50 SOLD OUT

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