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Heirloom Dahlia Bulbs

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Page 4 of Dahlias
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PREFERENCE, 1955Rarest

The blooms of this peachy-pink, semi-cactus dahlia are just the right size for bouquets, and its intriguingly dark stems add to its appeal both as a cut-flower and in the garden. It’s also a personal favorite of our new owner Vanessa, who urges you to give it a try! Semi-cactus, 3-5”, 4’, from Holland. Chart and care.

SD-79
1/$7.50
3/$21.50
5/$34
10/$63.50
25/$150

REQUIEM, 1952Rarest

Anything but somber, this rosy purple dahlia blooms today in the famous Purple Border at Sissinghurst, England’s best-loved garden. Its 4-5 inch blooms have a loose, informal look – much like a waterlily dahlia – and its strong, dark stems make it great for bouquets. Formal decorative, 4-5”, 3½-4½’, from Holland. Chart and care.

SD-90
1/$7.50
3/$21.50
5/$34
10/$63.50
25/$150

ROCCO, 1962

One of the smallest-flowered pompons we’ve ever seen, and dramatically dark, this was Scott’s favorite of all the dahlias we trialed in 2018. Its deep boysenberry-colored globes are produced in profusion, and their strong stems make it great for bouquets. Pompon, 1½”, 3-3½’, from Holland. Chart and care.

SD-94
1/$7.50
3/$21.50
5/$34
10/$63.50
25/$150

ROSEMARY WEBB, 1956Rarest

The peony-like flowers of this blissful dahlia open pale, primrose yellow and then mature to apple-blossom pink, giving you a bouquet of colors on every plant. They’re just the right size to pick for bouquets, too, and they bloom so abundantly you’ll never miss the ones you cut. Waterlily, 4-5”, just 3-4’ tall, from New Hampshire. Chart and care.

SD-75
1/$9.50
3/$27
5/$42.50
10/$80.50
Limit 10, please.

STOLZ VON BERLIN, 1884

Charmingly antique, ‘Pride of Berlin’ has plump, lavender-pink flowers that nod ever so slightly, like a demure Victorian fraulein. When it was introduced in 1884, Germany was a hotbed for exciting new dahlias, and since 1897 it’s been lovingly preserved by the venerable Deutsche Dahlien, Fuchsien, und Gladiolen Gesellschaft. Ball, 2-2½”, 3-4’, from Holland. Chart and care.

SD-19
1/$7.50
3/$21.50
5/$34
10/$63.50
25/$150

THOMAS EDISON, 1929

This velvety classic is still the truest deep purple of all dahlias, a color that photos can’t quite capture but that modern breeders envy. It was “named for the famous Electrical Wizard with his approval,” according to the L.L. Old’s catalog of 1939. Grow it and we think you’ll agree – it’s electrifying! Formal decorative, 6-8”, 3-4’, heat-tolerant, from Holland. Chart, care, and learn more.

SD-05
1/$7
3/$20
5/$31.50
10/$59.50
25/$140

TSUKI YORI NO SHISHA, 1953

The deeply fringed petals of this big, spectacular dahlia give it an otherworldly air, which is fitting since its name means “Messenger from the Moon” (the title of an enormously popular Japanese novel). When we look at it, though, we see Fourth of July sparklers and big shaggy dogs. What will you – or your kids or grandkids – see? Free-blooming, laciniated, 5-8”, 3-4’, from Holland. Chart and care.

SD-62
1/$7
3/$20
5/$31.50
10/$59.50
25/$140

WHITE ASTER, 1879Rarest

This is the world’s oldest surviving garden dahlia. (Do you need to know more?) With fresh green foliage and hundreds of small, ivory globes – each touched in the center with a bit of honey, or sunshine? – it has all the pristine, elemental beauty of a newborn baby. Preserved by a German nursery that has specialized in dahlias for close to a century, it’s a timeless classic. 1-2”, 3-5’, from New Hampshire. Chart, care, and learn more.

SD-10
1/$8.50
3/$24
5/$38
10/$72
25/$170

WISCONSIN RED, 1910?Rarest

This striking family heirloom with its ruby flowers on dark stems is SO easy to grow and store that it’s been a pass-along plant in Wisconsin since the early 1900s. We got our start from our friend Vytas Virkau who got it from Catherine Becker of Wausaukee who’d been growing it since the 1940s. Then we met Brenda and John Hagman whose family has been passing it down since 1910 or before – or so it seems. Learn more here, or just plant it and join the tradition! Ball, 3”, 4-5’, heat-tolerant, grown for us in Oregon. Chart and care.

SD-63
1/$9.50
3/$27
5/$42.50
10/$80.50
Limit 10, please.

YORK AND LANCASTER, 1915?Rarest

The history of this intriguing dahlia is a mystery. One British expert told us it was rediscovered in a chateau garden and dated to 1915. Another said he saw it growing in a rural hamlet near Lyon and it dated to the 1850s. We’ll keep researching its past, but one thing for certain is its garden appeal. Every flower is different. A few open deep red, a few pearly white, but most are an unpredictable mix of both colors – trè intéressant! Ball, 3”, 4-5’, grown for us in Oregon. Chart and care.

SD-61
1/$9.50
3/$27
5/$42.50
10/$80.50
Limit 10, please.

Page 4 of Dahlias
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