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Heirloom Daffodil Bulbs

From America’s Expert Source for Heirloom Flower Bulbs
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All bulbs for fall 2019 are SOLD OUT. Thanks for a great season!

Order these fall-planted bulbs NOW for delivery this OCTOBER.


WHY DAFFODILS? Daffodils are permanent, increase eagerly, and are wonderfully deer-and-rodent-proof.

DAFFODIL HISTORY — Daffodils grew in ancient Greece and in English gardens by the 1200s. For more, click here.

TIPS FOR SUCCESS — Daffodils are easy, but hardiness varies more than most sources admit. To learn more, click here.


Even Rarer Daffodils — Every year we get a handful of spectacular bulbs that are so rare we offer them Web-Only. For an alert the moment they go on sale, subscribe to our free, monthly email newsletter.

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NORTHERN LIGHTSSampler

Got snow? If you garden in zones 4a-6b(8bWC), this sampler of diverse, beautiful, time-tested WHITE daffodils is made for you. We’ll send you 3 bulbs each of 4 easy favorites – 3 ‘Broughshane’, 3 ‘Irene Copeland’, 3 pheasant’s eye, and 3 ‘Thalia’. All are easy to grow and sure to make your next spring lovelier than ever!

For 6, 9, or more of each variety, order additional samplers. Daffodil care.

COF-37
1/$30
2/$57
3/$81
4/$102
5/$120

ALBATROSS, 1891Rarest & Web-Only

With propeller-like petals and a frilled cup dipped in orange, this late Victorian treasure outshines its sibling ‘Seagull’ and was proudly described by the immortal Rev. Engleheart as “one of my finest and most brilliantly colored” creations. 3 W-YYO, late-mid, 18-20”, zones 4a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-972
3/$15
5/$24
10/$45
Limit 10, please.

ALBUS PLENUS ODORATUS, 1601Web-Only

Snowy white, richly fragrant, and hardy to zone 3, double pheasant’s-eyes appear on almost every daffodil list from Clusius’s in 1601 to catalogs of the early 1900s. Although they can be erratic bloomers, in long, cool springs and well-watered soils they’re heavenly. N. poeticus ‘Plenus’, 4 W-W, 16-18”, zones 3a-6b(8bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-01
5/$12
10/$23
25/$54
50/$102
100/$192

APRIL QUEEN, 1938Rarest

Medieval troubadours sang of a frolicking April Queen who led young and old in a merry dance of spring. This brilliant beauty with its ruffled, flame-kissed cup dances for what seems like forever in the garden, lasting longer in bloom than any other daffodil we’ve ever grown. To the dance! 2 W-YYO, 16-18”, zones 5a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-980
5/$12
10/$23
25/$54
50/$102
100/$192

ARGENT, 1902Rarest & Web-Only

“The very best of all double daffodils”? Yes, according to the great E.A. Bowles who, in 1914, raved about its “particularly graceful outline” and the “charming mingling of its silver and gold.” With long white petals thrusting out of a flurry of short, bright, yellow ones, ‘Argent’ is bursting with spring’s exuberance. From a cross of ‘Ornatus’ and super-strong ‘Van Sion’. 4 W-Y, 14-16”, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-999
3/$14
5/$22
10/$42
25/$99
50/$187

AVALANCHE, 1906

If daffodils were athletes, ‘Avalanche’ would be wearing Olympic gold. Extra vigorous, with 15-20 fragrant blossoms per stem, it’s so tough it was discovered in 1906 clinging to a sea-cliff in the Scilly Isles where tazettas had been grown by the millions in the 19th century. Superb in zones 6a-9b(11bWC), it’s also easy to force on pebbles for a winter treat. 8 W-Y, 16-18”, from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-02
5/$12.50
10/$24
25/$56
50/$106
100/$200

BANTAM, 1950

This bright little RHS AGM-winner has been called “the best intermediate-sized daffodil for the garden.” If its flowers were any larger, its vivid yellow petals and sizzling orange-rimmed cup might be too much, but to us they seem just right – perky and full of life, like the spirited little roosters it’s named for. 2 Y-YOO, late blooming, 14-16”, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-939
5/$10.50
10/$20
25/$47
50/$89
100/$168

BATH’S FLAME, 1913Rarest

Once celebrated as a larger, improved ‘Conspicuus’, this rare beauty features velvety primrose petals and an orange-kissed cup. After a lifetime of farming daffodils – and breeding award-winning new ones – our friend Ron Scamp of Cornwall ranks it as one of his three favorite heirlooms. By the good Rev. Engleheart, father of ‘Beersheba’, ‘White Lady’, and other enduring classics, 3 Y-YYO, 16-18”, zones 5a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-74
3/$9
5/$14.50
10/$27
25/$63.50
Limit 25, please.

BROUGHSHANE, 1938Rarest & Web-Only

Named for the tiny Irish hometown of its creator Guy Wilson – the 20th century’s grand master of white daffodils – beefy ‘Broughshane’ features creamy white petals and a deeply ruffled trumpet of white with hints of amber, all set off by handsome, blue-green, almost leek-like foliage. 1 W-W, 18-20”, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-75
3/$16
5/$25.50
10/$48
25/$113
50/$213

CARLTON, 1927

“There is nothing better,” wrote the immortal Henry Mitchell, “still unsurpassed for planting in quantity.” Lightly scented of vanilla, ‘Carlton’ increases vigorously from North Dakota to Florida and beyond – and it’s frugally priced! 2 Y-Y, 18-20”, zones 3a-9a(11bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-55
10/$16.50
25/$39
50/$74
100/$140
250/$330

CROESUS, 1912Rarest & Web-Only

With ruffled disks of orange-gold set against smooth, elegantly rounded petals of cream, this classic beauty is named for the fabulously wealthy King Croesus of Lydia who minted the world’s first coins. Plant it and you’ll be rich in beauty for years to come! 2 Y-YYO, 17-19”, zones 4a-7b(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-89
5/$15
10/$28.50
25/$67.50
50/$128
100/$240

DAPHNE, 1914Rarest

This refined double pheasant’s-eye was first found amid thousands of ‘Ornatus’ forced under glass and cut for the London market. Since there was no way to tell which bulb it came from, all were replanted outdoors – and two years later this jewel reappeared. 4 W-W, 21-23”, zones 5a-7a(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-982
3/$14.50
5/$23
10/$43.50
25/$103
50/$193

DICK WELLBAND, 1921Rarest & Web-Only

The rich color and flair of ‘Dick Wellband’ caused a sensation when it was first introduced – in a lavish display in front of yards and yards of draped black velvet – at the 1921 New York International Flower Show. Today it’s still as striking, growing strong across the country and especially well-loved in the South. 2 W-O, 16-20”, zones 5b-8a(10bWC), from Texas & Holland. Chart and care.

DA-12
3/$12.50
5/$20
10/$37.50
25/$88.50

N. x odorus ‘Plenus’, DOUBLE CAMPERNELLE, 1601

With dozens of petals neatly nested together as if in a perfect miniature rose – and just as fragrant – this tough little double daffodil has been grown and loved for over 400 years. 4 Y-Y, 10-12”, zones 6a-8b(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-08
5/$9.50
10/$18
25/$42.50
50/$80.50
100/$152

ERLICHEER, 1934

Great outside where winters aren’t too cold (zone 6 and warmer), double “Early Cheer” is also our favorite daffodil for winter forcing indoors on pebbles and water. (We’ll send easy directions, or see our Forcing page.) It blooms in frothy clusters of 15-20 richly fragrant florets of creamy, old-lace white flecked with gold. 4 W-Y, 14-16”, zones 6a-9b(11bWC), fresh, fat California bulbs. Chart and care.

DA-53
3/$10.50
5/$16.50
10/$31.50
25/$74.50
50/$140

FEU DE JOIE, 1927Rarest & Web-Only

It’s back! Introduced at the height of the Roaring Twenties, this free-spirited flower combines a dozen long, wavy outer petals with a crinkled center of orange and gold. Pronounced fə də JWAH, it was bred by the master of doubles, William Copeland, and named for a celebratory rifle salute known as the “fire of joy.” 4 W-O, 18-20”, early-mid season, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-970
3/$23
5/$36.50
10/$69
25/$163
Limit 25, please.

FIRETAIL, 1910Rarest

To enjoy the full brilliance of this graceful antique, catch it when it first opens. Although its flat, rippled cup may not be the “solid, deep rich red” that Albert Calvert praised in his monumental 1929 Daffodil Growing for Pleasure and Profit, it’s close – and stunning. 3 W-R, 18-20”, zones 5a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-956
3/$10
5/$16
10/$30
25/$71
50/$133

GERANIUM, 1930

Congratulations to this ageless beauty for winning the 2016 Wister Award, the ADS’s highest honor for garden daffodils! With clustered florets almost twice the size of most poetazes, and sun-proof, juicy orange cups that stay vibrant day after day, it’s a late-season pick-me-up you’ll look forward to spring after spring. 8 W-O, 18-20”, zones 5b-8b(10bWC), from Holland. See all of our Wister Award-winners. Chart and care.

DA-58
5/$8.50
10/$16
25/$38
50/$72
100/$136

GRAND PRIMO, 1780

This legendary, 18th-century tazetta is one of our most sought-after treasures. “Certainly no finer flowering bulbs are available for Southerners,” Ogden writes in Garden Bulbs for the South. “They are by far the most vigorous, persistent, and floriferous” narcissus in zones 8a-9b(11bWC). If you garden there, you want this jewel! Aka ‘Grand Primo Citroniere’, 8 W-Y,
14-16”, fat, fresh California-grown bulbs. Chart and care.

DA-59
3/$16
5/$25.50
10/$48
25/$113
50/$213

HENRY IRVING, 1885Rarest & Web-Only

Every spring in the quaint old parterre garden at Keukenhof, Holland’s wonderland of bulbs, this charming antique trumpet launches the show. And who was Henry Irving? Visit www.theirvingsociety.org.uk to learn more about the Victorian actor who still has a fan club 100 years after his death. 1 Y-Y, 15-16”, zones 4a-8b(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-90
3/$12.50
5/$20
10/$37.50
Limit 10, please.

IRENE COPELAND, 1915

This is the neatest double daffodil we’ve ever seen. With creamy white petals arranged just so and trimmed with bits of pale primrose yellow, it would look perfect on an Edwardian lady’s Easter bonnet. For a photo of the real Irene and her sister Mary along with their fascinating story as told to us by Irene’s daughter, click here. 4 W-Y, 16-18”, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-20
3/$10
5/$16
10/$30
25/$71
50/$133

JENNY, 1943Rarest

The Royal Horticultural Society and our crew here at OHG agree – this is a wonderful little daffodil. Winner of the RHS AGM, it’s a strong grower with flowers that open white and yellow, mature to almost pure white, and look like miniature shooting stars. Try it, as our friend John Shipton recommends, paired with blue Scilla siberica or grape hyacinths. 6 W-W, early-mid, 12-14”, zones 5a-8a(10aWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-945
3/$10.50
5/$16.50
10/$31.50
25/$74.50
50/$140

JOHN EVELYN, 1920Rarest & Web-Only

From the creator of the great Copeland family trio — ‘Irene’, ‘Mary’, and ‘Mrs. William’ — comes this rare flower with round, creamy white petals and a wonderfully ruffled cup of apricot-gold maturing to lemon. (Read the family’s story here.) Its name honors the great 17th-century diarist and author of books about everything from trees (his famous Sylva) to “sallets.” 2 W-O, early blooming, 18-20”, zones 4a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-975
3/$14
5/$22
10/$42
Limit 10, please.

LOUISE DE COLIGNY, 1940Rarest

So many of you asked for this sweet-scented, apricot beauty that we kept knocking on doors until we found the one last Dutch farmer growing it. Its form can be unruly, but its apricot shading and light, enchanting perfume have won it many fans. Its name honors the remarkable wife of William the Silent. 2 W-YYP, 18-20”, zones 4a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-989
5/$11.50
10/$22
25/$51.50
50/$97.50
100/$184

LUCIFER, 1890Rarest & Web-Only

It’s back! We’re big fans of this vibrant Victorian that was born in Ireland and named for the Archangel himself. Look with your imagination and you’ll see a reflection of heavenly wings in its long white petals, and a hint of what’s to come in its fiery cup. 2 W-YOO, 16-18”, zones 5a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-73
3/$12
5/$19
10/$36
Limit 10, please.

N. hispanicus, MAXIMUS, TRUMPET MAJOR, 1576Rarest

Celebrated in gardens for over 400 years, ‘Maximus’ or ‘Trumpet Major’ is an especially fine form of N. hispanicus with a wild, primeval look. Its trumpet is boldly scalloped and flared, its petals make a dramatic star, and it lifts up its face as if worshipping the sun. It’s been treasured by Elizabethan, Victorian, and Arts-and-Crafts gardeners alike – and now it’s your turn! 1 Y-Y, 14-16”, zones 5a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-88
3/$15
5/$24
10/$45
25/$106
50/$200

N. x italicus, MINOR MONARQUE, 1809Rarest

Often the first tazetta to bloom in the new year, this sturdy pass-along plant has narrow, pointed petals that make its clustered blooms look like fistfuls of stars. As Texas bulb expert Thad Howard wrote, it’s “enduring, sweet-scented” and “deserves more respect and popularity.” 8 W-Y, 20”, zones 8a-9b(10bWC), from Louisiana. Chart and care.

DA-963
3/$9
5/$14.50
10/$27
25/$63.50
50/$120

N. MOSCHATUS, 1604Rarest

Swans-Neck, Goose-Neck, Silver Bells – if you’re looking for that elusive Southern heirloom, this form of the wild N. moschatus may not be 100% identical but probably even your granny couldn’t tell them apart. It’s short and sweet, with creamy white blooms that nod demurely, the epitome of spring. (See also the very similar ‘Colleen Bawn’.) Aka N. cernuus, 13 W-W, 10-12”, zones 5a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Chart, care, and learn more.

DA-979
5/$9
10/$17
25/$40.50
50/$76.50
100/$144

NIVETH, 1931Rarest

This refined, up-town cousin of everybody’s favorite ‘Thalia’ sets the hearts of daffodil connoisseurs aflutter. It’s sublimely graceful, with smoother, thicker, more shapely petals of a white that expert Michael Jefferson-Brown calls “dazzling in its purity.” 5 W-W, 18-20”, zones 5a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-994
3/$15
5/$24
10/$45
25/$106
50/$200

N. poeticus recurvus, PHEASANT’S EYE, 1600, 1831

The poet’s narcissus grows wild in alpine meadows from Spain into the Balkans and is pictured in English herbals of the early 1600s. This form is the oldest available and, though it dates officially to 1831, it’s indistinguishable from those in colonial gardens. It’s famously fragrant and late-blooming, with sparkling white petals that arch back from a “green eye and crimson-fringed crown” (William Robinson). Wister Award winner (see more), 13 W-YYR, 12-14”, zones 4a-6b(8bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-30
5/$10.50
10/$20
25/$47
50/$89
100/$168

POLAR ICE, 1936Rarest

Although it’s disappearing from the marketplace, this sparkling white daffodil is just too good to let go. Its broad white petals surround a tiny, ruffled cup that opens citron yellow and matures to pure white with a cool glimmer of spring green deep in the center. 3 W-W, mid-late blooming, 14-18”, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-936
3/$14
5/$22
10/$42
25/$99
50/$187

N. gayi, PRINCEPS, 1830Rarest

Extra-early and extra-beautiful, this wildflowery trumpet daffodil is a bicolor N. pseudonarcissus (see Lent lily). Millions were once harvested for bouquets sold in London’s Covent Garden, and it’s great for naturalizing. As daffodil connoisseur Alec Gray wrote in 1955, “a drift of it is a thing of... lightness and grace.” 1 W-Y, 14-16”, zones 5a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-31
3/$10
5/$16
10/$30
25/$71
50/$133

QUEEN OF THE NORTH, 1908

With her elegant, snow-white petals and fluted lemon cup, this ‘Queen’ is as cool as a frosty glass of lemonade. “Certainly one of the most beautiful of all daffodils,” the great Pennsylvania plantsman John Wister wrote in 1930, and she’s still winning blue ribbons in daffodil shows all across the country today! 3 W-Y, 16-18”, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-33
5/$11.50
10/$22
25/$51.50
50/$97.50
100/$184

RIP VAN WINKLE, 1884

‘Rip’ is a definite cutie. Early and dwarf, its spiky little blooms look like tiny yellow suns, cactus dahlias, sea anemones, or even mop-headed elves – depending on your imagination. It’s also cheap and wonderfully easy to force. 4 Y-Y, 6-8”, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-34
10/$14.50
25/$34.50
50/$65.50
100/$123
250/$290

ROMANCE, 1959Rarest

This RHS Award of Garden Merit winner caused a sensation when it was first introduced, and although increasingly hard to find, it’s still a remarkably beautiful daffodil. More richly colored than our older “pinks,” it has sparkling white petals and a short, lobed cup that opens peach-to-coral and gets rosier every day. 2 W-P, late-mid, 16-20”, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-944
5/$9
10/$17
25/$40.50
50/$76.50
100/$144

ROSE OF MAY, 1950Rarest

True stock! As fragrant as any rose, this elegant, double pheasant’s-eye was bred by Guy Wilson, the shy Irish fellow who gave the world ‘Broughshane’ and dozens of other impeccable daffodils. With blowsy whorls of ivory white petals it looks like an old-fashioned rose, too. Best in cool, moist spots with well-drained soil. 4 W-W, 16-18”, zones 4a-6b(8bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-997
5/$12.50
10/$24
25/$56
50/$106
100/$200

RUSTOM PASHA, 1930Rarest & Web-Only

Named for a prize-winning “red” stallion raced back then by the Aga Khan, this bright, cheerful flower was one of the first with a truly orange, sun-proof cup. We managed to import a few bulbs of it from Australia in the 1990s and slowly built up stock, but the last time we had enough to offer it was in 2010. In other words, if you want it, you ’d be wise to order now! 2 Y-O, zones 5a-7b(8bWC), early-mid season, 18-20” from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-978
3/$11.50
5/$18
10/$34.50
25/$81.50
Limit 25, please.

SCARLET GEM, 1910Rarest & Web-Only

New! Bright, fragrant, and charming, this old poetaz “thoroughly deserves its wide popularity,” wrote daffodil expert Michael Jefferson-Brown in 1951, and it remained a favorite throughout the century. With primrose petals and a tangerine cup, it was bred by the great P.D. Williams of Cornwall. 8 Y-O, mid-late blooming, 18-20”, zones 5b-8b(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-36
5/$9
10/$17
25/$40.50
50/$76.50
100/$144

SEAGULL, 1893Rarest & Web-Only

It’s back! Prettier than any gull we’ve ever seen, this free-flowering Victorian classic has pristine white petals that recall wings, sails, or the sweeping arms of a windmill. Its short canary cup is fleetingly edged with apricot. For best color, protect from full sun. 3 W-Y, 14-18”, zones 5a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-49
3/$15
5/$24
10/$45
25/$106
Limit 25, please.

STAINLESS, 1960

For a daffodil this new to win a place in our catalog, it has to be something special, and ‘Stainless’ is. One of the last introductions of the great Guy Wilson, the master of white daffodils, it’s so bright and pure and cool – from the tips of its velvety-smooth petals to the edge of its neatly fluted cup – that it’s long been praised as “whiter than white.” 2 W-W, late-mid season, 18-20”, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-938
5/$12
10/$23
25/$54
50/$102
100/$192

STILTON, 1909Rarest & Web-Only

Bred by Devonshire nurseryman E.B. Champernowne, the man who gave the world ‘Red Devon’, this much rarer daffodil survives from the Golden Age of pheasant’s-eyes. We have just 100 bulbs this year from one of Holland’s greatest daffodil collectors, and it could be years before he has any more to share with us, so get it while you can! 9 W-YYR, late blooming, 14-16”, zones 4a-7a(9bWC). Chart and care.

DA-947
3/$12.50
5/$20
10/$37.50
25/$88.50
50/$167

SUN DISC, 1946

Praised as “one of the most perfect of all daffodils” by expert Michael Jefferson-Brown, and famed for its incredible vigor, this little jonquil has won two of the garden world’s highest honors, the ADS Wister Award and the RHS Award of Garden Merit. Its unusual, circular shape makes it a real eye-catcher in the garden, and like all jonquils it’s fragrant! By Alec Gray, 7 Y-Y, 8-12”, late, zones 6a-8b(10bWC), from Holland. See all of our Wister Award-winners. Chart and care.

DA-954
10/$13
25/$31
50/$58.50
100/$111
250/$260

THALIA, 1916

Orchids or doves? With 2-3 nodding flowers per stem and ivory petals that swoop dramatically back from the cup, ‘Thalia’ may well remind you of both. It’s a strong, dependable grower North and South, the oldest garden form of the wild N. triandrus, and the 2013 winner of the ADS’s Wister Award! 5 W-W, 14-16”, zones 4a-8b(10bWC), from Holland. See all of our Wister Award-winners. Chart, care, and learn more.

DA-42
10/$16
25/$38
50/$72
100/$136
250/$320

N. obvallaris, THE TENBY DAFFODIL, 1796

This sweet little teddy bear of a daffodil has grown wild for centuries on the coast of Wales, and its early blooms were once rushed to London to be sold at Covent Garden. Its trumpet is shorter than most wild daffodils (see Lent lily), adding to its pudgy charm. 2015 Wister Award winner (see more), 13 Y-Y, 8-10”, zones 5a-8b(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-40
10/$14.50
25/$34.50
50/$65.50
100/$123
250/$290

TWINK, 1925Rarest & Web-Only

This Jazz Age classic has long, rippling petals of primrose-to-cream flaring jauntily out of a ruffled center of orange and gold. Hardy north through zone 5, it’s especially well-loved in the South because, unlike many other doubles, it opens reliably even there. 4 Y-O, mid-season, 18-20”, zones 5a-8b(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-52
3/$17
5/$27
10/$51
25/$120
Limit 25, please.

VAN SION, 1620

Aka ‘Telamonius Plenus’, this ancient flower is “the most important of all doubles” (A.M. Kirby, 1907). It’s also the double most often found at old homesites, multiplying without care. And it’s the most confusing. In its first year or a perfect spot, its doubling is neatly contained within the trumpet. Most years, though, it all explodes into a wild froth of green and gold. See what we mean and learn more here. 4 Y-Y, 14-16”, zones 4a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-39
5/$14
10/$26.50
25/$63
50/$119
100/$224

VIREO, 1962Rarest

“Nature’s first green is gold,” Robert Frost wrote, and it’s the vivid green deep in the cup of this great little jonquil that sets it apart, giving its lemony flowers a distinct, fresh, spring-time feeling. Named for a small olive-green songbird, it was bred by America’s greatest daffodil breeder, Grant Mitsch, who was also an avid birder. 7 Y-GYY, 9-12” very late blooming, zones 6a-8b(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-998
5/$9
10/$17
25/$40.50
50/$76.50
100/$144

WHITE LADY, 1897Rarest

This “regal beauty” and “good doer” is “the daffodil I now prefer to all others” – so wrote Mrs. Francis King in 1921, and since she was a founder of the Garden Club of America and author of nine popular garden books, that’s high praise indeed. With sparkling petals and a ruffled yellow cup, ‘White Lady’ is old-fashioned but full of life. 3 W-Y, 16-18”, zones 5a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-47
3/$10
5/$16
10/$30
25/$71
50/$133

WILL SCARLETT, 1898Rarest & Web-Only

It’s back! The brilliant color of this groundbreaking daffodil so dazzled the world when it was first introduced that three bulbs sold for £100 – the equivalent today of over $12,000. Its petals are notoriously unruly, but as William Arnold wrote in 1921, “though a somewhat loosely put together flower, [it] is nevertheless very handsome.” Bred by the illustrious Rev. Engleheart, it’s well named for the youngest of Robin Hood’s Merry Men who is often depicted wearing red silk. 2 W-O, 21-23”, late-mid season, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-965
3/$18
5/$28.50
10/$54
Limit 10, please.

W.P. MILNER, 1869

Short and sweet, this quaint little elf dates back to the dawn of the Victorian daffodil renaissance. Its nodding trumpet and twisted petals are a soft, silvery yellow that seems to be the embodiment of spring sunshine. As an added treat for inquiring noses, it has a light cowslip fragrance. 1 W-W, 6-8”, zones 5a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-45
10/$11
25/$26
50/$49.50
100/$93.50
250/$220

XIT, 1948

“So small, so pure,” says bulb maven Anna Pavord, you might think it’s “at heart a snowdrop but was given the wrong clothes.” Just six inches tall and frosty white, it was bred from a wild species that grows high in the Atlas Mountains of Morocco and named for the dwarf knight in a series of novels set amid the intrigue of Tudor England. (Game of Thrones, anyone?) Best in acid to neutral soils, 3 W-W, late-mid, 5-7”, zones 6a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.

DA-937
5/$12
10/$23
25/$54
50/$102
100/$192

ANNE FRANK, 1959Rarest & Web-Only

It’s back! Named for the girl whose indomitable spirit lives on in her immortal diary, this exceptionally rare double combines stainless white outer petals with a heart of deep, vibrant red-orange. It’s a dazzling daffodil – and a visual metaphor for Anne herself. 4 W-O, late-mid, 18-20”, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from Holland. Chart and care. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

DA-952 3/$24.50 5/$39 10/$73.50 25/$174 50/$327 SOLD OUT

BEERSHEBA, 1923Rarest

This immaculate classic with its slender trumpet is early-blooming, free-flowering, quick to increase, and a lovely, warm ivory. Introduced by the good Rev. Engleheart when he was in his 70s, it won high praise from Guy Wilson, the century’s greatest daffodil breeder, as “a flower of arresting beauty and outstanding purity.” 1 W-W, 14-16”, zones 4a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

DA-04 3/$16 5/$25.50 10/$48 25/$113 50/$213 SOLD OUT

N. x odorus, CAMPERNELLE, 1601

Beware of imitations! Our Texas-grown bulbs are the true heirloom that has made itself at home since colonial days in old gardens throughout the South – and north through zone 6 at least. (We even have a customer growing them on the shores of Lake Superior.) With their distinctively lobed cups, our true Campernelles are early, fragrant, and full of the grace and staying-power of wildflowers. You’ll have more and more every year! Aka Large Jonquil, 13 Y-Y, 10-14”, zones 6a-8b(10bWC), from Texas. Chart, care, and learn more. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

DA-07 3/$12 5/$19 10/$36 25/$85 50/$160 SOLD OUT

CASSANDRA, 1897Rarest & It’s Back!

This very rare Victorian pheasant’s eye is another treasure from the illustrious Rev. Engleheart who gave the world ‘Beersheba’, ‘Lucifer’, ‘White Lady’, and many others. In 1905, the British Saturday Review praised its petals of “driven snow,” cup edged with “deep madder,” and “heart of pure green.” 9WC-GWYR, 18-20”, zones 4a-7a(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

DA-991 3/$18 5/$28.50 10/$54 25/$128 50/$240 SOLD OUT

CHINITA, 1922Rarest & Web-Only

With a unique look and fabulous scent, ‘Chinita’ is the love child of a pheasant’s eye and a tazetta such as Avalanche. Its flat, ribbed, golden eye is circled with orange, but what really sets it apart are its pale amber-to-cream petals. From the moment it first bloomed for us, we wanted to share it with you! 8Y-YYR, 21-23”, zones 6a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care. Our grower is increasing his stock and we hope to offer it again soon. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

DA-981 3/$15 5/$24 10/$45 25/$106 50/$200 SOLD OUT

CONSPICUUS, 1869Rarest & Web-Only

Delicate looking but strong-growing, this graceful flower – long known as ‘Barrii Conspicuus’ – was one of the landmark achievements of the Victorian daffodil renaissance. A clump in bloom, with its fluttering petals and crinkled, orange-rimmed cup, may well remind you of a host of antique butterflies. Learn more. 3 Y-YYO, 14-16”, zones 4a-7b(10bWC), from Holland. Chart and care. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

DA-03 3/$11 5/$17.50 10/$33 25/$78 50/$147 SOLD OUT

EARLY PEARL, 1899Rarest & Web-Only

Nameless but thriving, ‘Early Pearl’ was rediscovered in old gardens of the Southeast’s “Spanish Moss Belt.” Early to bloom and best where summers are hot, it has starry white petals, tiny citron cups that mature to white, and a fresher scent than most tazettas. Experts believe it dates to the late 1800s. 8 W-Y, 14-16”, zones 8a-9b(11bWC), big, fat California bulbs. Chart and care. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

DA-66 3/$9.50 5/$15 10/$28.50 25/$67.50 50/$127 SOLD OUT

GLORY OF LISSE, 1901Rarest & Web-Only

This fragrant beauty survives from the dawn of the 20th century when the wildflower grace of pheasant’s-eye narcissus made them especially popular. With snow-white petals and an eye of old gold trimmed with red, it’s named for 800-year-old Lisse, home of the world famous Keukenhof bulb gardens. 9 W-YYR, 18-20”, zones 4a-7a(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

DA-971 3/$10 5/$16 10/$30 25/$71 50/$133 SOLD OUT

GOLDEN SPUR, 1885Rarest & Web-Only

“If I could have but one,” wrote A.M. Kirby in 1907 in America’s first book about daffodils, “I would choose this.” It’s a favorite of ours, too, a glorious Victorian trumpet full of wildflower vigor and grace. It’s extra early, blooming as the crocus fade, and multiplies with gusto. 1 Y-Y, 14-15”, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

DA-17 5/$11.50 10/$22 25/$51.50 50/$97.50 100/$184 SOLD OUT

INSULINDE, 1921Rarest & Web-Only

‘Insulinde’ somehow manages to be both graceful and exuberant at the same time. Framed by a row or two of creamy white outer petals, its center is a throng of luminous orange petalets spiked with random flares of cream. Bred by the illustrious Mrs. Backhouse (of daffodil and lily fame), it’s named for a wildly popular Victorian novel set in Indonesia. 4 W-O, 21-23”, zones 5a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

DA-986 3/$12 5/$19 10/$36 25/$85 50/$160 SOLD OUT

N. jonquilla, JONQUIL, EARLY LOUISIANA, 1612

“The sweetest smelling flower your grandmother grew,” says our friend Celia Jones of Sisters’ Bulb Farm near Shreveport, and for many Southerners N. jonquilla’s fragrance is the essence of spring. With clusters of nickel-sized flowers that seem made for fairies, our true, American-heirloom “French” strain blooms much earlier than the widely-offered Dutch strains. Aka Sweeties, Simplex, Cologne Bottle, and more; 13 Y-Y, 8-10”, zones 6b-8b(10bWC), from Texas. Chart, care, and learn more. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

DA-21 3/$12 5/$19 10/$36 25/$85 50/$160 SOLD OUT

KEATS, 1968Rarest & Web-Only

It’s back! The weirdest daffodil we’ve ever grown, and very rarely offered, this fascinating flower has six narrow, green-tinted “petaloid segments” that thrust out of the middle of its cup looking like tiny fingers or horns or tentacles. Plant it where you can appreciate it up close (and show it off), or pick a few to entertain you indoors. By Alec Gray, 4 W-Y, 18-20”, very late, zones 5a-7b(10aWC), from Holland. Chart and care. Chart and care. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

DA-955 3/$19 5/$30 10/$57 25/$135 50/$253 SOLD OUT

KING ALFRED, 1899Rarest

True stock! You may think you’ve grown this landmark daffodil, but since the 1950s most bulbs sold in the US as ‘King Alfred’ have been newer, over-sized impostors that were easier to mass-produce in the mild, moist Dutch climate. The real ‘King’ is actually so rare today that we can’t offer it every year, but we have a small supply this fall from Holland’s greatest daffodil collector — and it’s gold, bold, and everything a world famous icon should be. 1 Y-Y, 21-23", zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Chart and care. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

DA-23 3/$19.50 5/$31 10/$58.50 25/$138 50/$260 SOLD OUT

N. x medioluteus, TWIN SISTERS, 1597Web-Only

“Generally knowne everywhere,” wrote the great herbalist John Gerard in 1597 about this fragrant wildflower he called Primrose Peerless. Today its many folk names which include Loving Couples, Cemetery Ladies, and April Beauty attest to its wide-spread popularity and endurance.With two blooms per stem, white with tiny citron cups, it’s also wonderfully late-blooming. Formerly N. biflorus, 13 W-Y, 12-14”, zones 6a-8b(10bWC), from Texas. Chart and care. If you’d like to be notified when it’s back in stock, sign up for an email alert.

DA-44 3/$12 5/$19 10/$36 25/$85 50/$160 SOLD OUT

WHY GROW DAFFODILS? Daffodils are permanent, increase eagerly, and are wonderfully deer-and-rodent-proof.

HISTORY — Native mainly to the Mediterranean, narcissus were grown by the Egyptians and Greeks and brought into English gardens by the 1200s. While thousands of new tulips and hyacinths were being developed, the number of daffodils grew slowly. Maybe 50 date to before 1700, another 350 by 1860. But then a couple of British enthusiasts set to work and from 1860 to 1900 roughly 1000 new varieties were introduced. By 1930 there were another 6000, making the early 20th century a Golden Age. Only a fraction survive today.

HEAT-LOVING DAFFODILS — If you garden where winters are warm, see our “Daffodils for the South and Warm West” for expert guidance.

DAFFODILS AS CUT FLOWERS — Did you know daffodils will last much longer in bouquets if you cut them at the right stage and let their gooey sap drain out before adding them to the vase? To learn more, see our Bulbs as Cut Flowers page.

DAFFODIL ARCHIVES — For customer tips and raves, the stories behind the bulbs, links and books, history, news, and more, see our Daffodil Newsletter Archives.

TIPS FOR SUCCESS — Though many sources say they’ll ALL thrive from zones 3 through 8, hardiness really varies depending on their ancestry. And many do well in zones 9 and 10 of the West Coast. Our zone recommendations will guide you. Daffodils like well-drained (but not bone-dry) soil and full sun, but they adapt to light shade pretty well. In the South they welcome afternoon shade and dry soil in summer. Bulb size varies widely, with and heirloom bulbs often being smaller. We always get the largest bulbs we can.

PLANTING & CARE — Plant in mid-fall when soil cools; earlier is better than later. If necessary, store till then in open bags in a cool, dry spot.

Choose a sunny to lightly shaded site. Full sun is best in the North, but the further South you garden, the more shade you can give them.

Plant in well-drained soil. Avoid or improve clay soil, or grow in raised beds. Dig down three times the height of the bulbs, about 6-8 inches for standard varieties, 4-6 for smaller varieties such as ‘W.P. Milner’, and plant with the narrow ends up, about 6 inches apart from center to center (or closer for a lush look). For each bulb scratch a tablespoon of bulb fertilizer into the surface (slow-release 10-10-10 is ideal). Water, and keep moist through the fall while the bulbs are growing new roots, through the winter if the soil doesn’t freeze, and through the spring at least till blooming is finished.

Re-fertilize lightly every spring and fall. After bloom, remove the spent blossoms but allow foliage to yellow completely (to feed the bulbs for next year’s bloom) before removing it. IN THE SOUTH, keep soil dry when soil warms up after blooming and through the summer to avoid disease problems.

Deer, rodents, and most other pests leave daffodils alone, but if some of yours mysteriously fail to appear in the spring, visit our Daffodil Bulb Fly page to learn about the likely culprit.

With good care daffodils will multiply, making an increasingly beautiful display every year. When decreased bloom indicates overcrowding, dig and divide after foliage yellows.


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