Home

Tulips: Lost Forever?

From America’s Expert Source for Heirloom Flower Bulbs
My Basket
My Basket

Page 7 of Tulips: Lost?
<< Previous  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11  Next >>


MIRELLA, 1953Rarest

Winner of the prestigious RHS Award of Garden Merit, this mid-century classic has “buff rose” petals enlivened by silvery pink petal edges and “a broad flame of raspberry” (Killingback, Tulips). After decades of popularity, it’s getting harder and harder to find – so we’ve added it to our ark. Triumph, 22-24”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2017. ‘Mirella’ seems to be commercially extinct, but we’ll keep searching for it!


MON TRESOR BONTLOF, 1875

Variegated plants are quite the rage today, but here’s one we’re pretty sure none of your neighbors are growing. Bontlof is Dutch for variegated, and the deep green leaves of ‘My Treasure’ are richly bontlof with a ribbon-like edging of yellow that harmonizes exquisitely with its glowing yellow flowers. And it’s fragrant! Who could ask for anything more? Single Early, 10-12”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus. Last offered in 2016. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


MRS. KEIGHTLEY, 1902

This “indispensable” old Irish tulip was lauded for its “exquisite scent, a delicate elusive perfume” by A.D. Hall in his 1928 masterpiece, The Book of the Tulip. One of a fabulous assortment of old, cottage-garden tulips collected by William Baylor Hartland of Cork in the late 1800s, it has also been known as Gesneriana lutea pallida and ‘Bird of Paradise’ — and there is something delightfully bird-like about its graceful shape. Single Late, 18-20”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus. Last offered in 2004. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


MRS. SCHEEPERS, 1930

Majestically tall and elegant, this sturdy, long-lived beauty was first sold in 1931 for $5 a bulb — in Depression dollars! Its extra oomph comes from extra chromosomes; it’s considered the world’s first tetraploid tulip. Deep canary yellow, Single Late/Cottage, 30”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2008. Available elsewhere.


MR. VAN DER HOEF, 1911

Although double tulips were most popular in Victorian gardens, this later introduction was lauded in catalogs through the 1930s as “extra good,” “one of the finest,” and “exquisite.” Its fragrant, pure yellow, overstuffed flowers light up the garden like big bowls of sunshine. Last offered in 2012, Double Early, 10-12”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Last offered in 2017. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


MURILLO, 1860

One of history’s most famous tulips, ‘Murillo’ was wildly popular during Victorian days, and even as late as 1912 The Garden reported that “ladies simply rave over it.” It’s also wildly prolific, having produced over 130 “sports” (mutations) including most of today’s Double Earlies. Think what it might produce for you! Double Early, 10-12”, zones 4b-7a(8aWC), from the Hortus. Last offered in 2014. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


ORANGE FAVORITE, 1930

This deliciously fragrant flower is “one of the best of all tulips,” writes Anna Pavord in her monumental Bulb, although it’s “not for the faint-hearted.” (Does that sound like a challenge?) Its buds open into “stupendous,” glossy, ruffled blooms of orange feathered with wisps of rose and green. Although the harvest was so small we didn’t put it in our print catalog this year, here it is! Parrot, 20” , zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Holland. See our other unusually fragrant tulips. Last offered in 2017. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


PAEONY GOLD, 1700

An exotic green and gold protea from some trendy SoHo floral designer? No, but that’s what this 300-year-old double tulip looks like when it first starts to open — and no modern tulip looks anything like it! For a close-up view of its weird beauty, simply click on our small photo. Now imagine it in a vase where you can watch it day by day as it slowly matures from a chartreuse symphony into a peony-like blossom of gold brushed with red. Wow! Double Late, 10-12”, zones 4b-7a(8aWC), from the Hortus. Last offered in 2013. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


PAPILLON, 1914

A great staff favorite here at Old House Gardens, elegant ‘Papillon’ has unusually dark, garnet-red petals that seem even darker because of their broad, feathery edging of gold (or is that melted butter?). It’s named for the darkly romantic Madame Papillon, an 1860 ballet by Offenbach and Taglioni about a butterfly (papillon is French for butterfly) that perishes in flames. Single Late, 18-20”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus. Last offered in 2008. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


PERFECTA, 1750

Like a brilliant flag whipped into a frenzy by raging winds — or the claw of some freakish lobster from the Great Barrier Reef — or a Baroque filigree splashed with paint by the Color Kittens — that’s ‘Perfecta.’ One of Nature’s weirdest and most wonderful jewels, it’s been preserved by gardeners for over 250 years so you can enjoy it today. (For other extra-rare parrots, see ‘Amiral de Constantinople’, ‘Cafe Brun’, and ‘Markgraaf van Baden’.) 18”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Last offered in 2014. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


Page 7 of Tulips: Lost?
<< Previous  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11  Next >>