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Tulips: Lost Forever?

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Page 6 of Tulips: Lost?
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JULIET, 1845

An unusually old English florist tulip, ‘Juliet’ is a lovely teacup-shaped flower from North Yorkshire with rosy-red flames on snow-white petals. Though by the Tulip Society’s rigorous show standards its patterning is less than perfect, you’re still going to gasp at its beauty. Late-blooming, 14-16”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus. Last offered in 2003. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


KROESKOP, 1830

If you can look at it with Victorian eyes, you’ll love ‘Kroeskop’ for its rich colors, complexity, and profusion. Its abundant petals are irregularly notched and frilled, giving rise to its Dutch name which translates as “frizzy-head.” Since we first saw it blooming in all its crimson, gilt-edged glory at the Hortus Bulborum, we knew we wanted to share it with you. Double Early, 10-12”, zones 4b-7a(8aWC). Last offered in 2011. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


LA HARPE, 1863

This lovely lavender tulip with its short, old-fashioned cup was once part of the “unrivalled collection” of Vincent van der Vinne which was sold at auction in 1863. La Harpe is French for “the harp,” but it’s also the name of three prominent 18th-century Frenchmen: a general, a playwright, and – our favorite – an early explorer of Texas, Arkansas, and Oklahoma. Single Late, 18-22”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Last offered in 2016. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


LA REINE ROSE, 1904

Antique beyond its years, this quaint little ‘Rose Queen’ looks a lot like the tulips in Besler’s magnificent Hortus Eystettensis of 1613. Its graceful, flame-shaped petals shade from ruby to deep rose to a feathery edging of pink, and it seems to glow with all the energy of spring itself. Single Early, 10-12”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Last offered in 2010. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


LA REMARQUABLE, 1879

Bulb merchants have tried for over a century to capture in words the unusual colors of this elegant old tulip. One called it “deep crimson lake with a wide margin of blush pink,” another “claret purple tipped old rose.” Maybe best of all was Peter Henderson in 1907 who called it “silky plum shading off to silvery pink at the edges.” Its shape is equally distinct, with broad, pointed petals that arch gently outwards. All in all, it really is remarquable. Single Early, 10-12”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from Hortus Bulborum. Last offered in 2012. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


LE MOGOL, 1913

This vibrant rose-colored tulip is delicately highlighted with a faint bronze blush on its outer petals. In 1921 when tall, late tulips in artistic shades like this were the height of fashion, ‘Le Mogol’ was part of a spectacular display showcasing over 300 different varieties of Breeder and Darwin tulips at the New York Botanical Garden. Single Late, 22-24”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Last offered in 2016. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


LINCOLNSHIRE, 1942

This jewel-toned beauty is a worthy emblem of its namesake, England’s traditional bulb-growing district. It’s a glorious deep red, late-blooming, tough, and highly endangered — only one farmer in the world still grows it today. If it were “just another red tulip,” would our customers be writing us love letters about it? Cottage/Single Late, 20”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Iowa (yes, Iowa!). Last offered in 2007. We hope to offer it again someday.


LORD STANLEY, 1860

Hockey fans may love this classic Bizarre because of its name (Go Red Wings!), but gardeners love it because it’s so gorgeously flamed with rich mahogany-red on gold. It often wins Premier Flame at shows of the Wakefield and North of England Tulip Society, and we never seem to get enough of it. Broken, late-blooming, 16-20”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Last offered in 2015. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


MADRAS, 1913Rarest & Web-Only

One of the break-out stars from our former Brown Sugar sampler, this “handsome Old Dutch Tulip,” to quote the Barr and Sons catalog of 1931, is “golden-bronze, the outer petals being flushed plum” – and it’s fragrant. Although it was officially introduced in 1913, Wister says it was listed by Krelage as far back as 1870. Dutch Breeder/Single Late, 22-26”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Last offered in 2018. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


MARKGRAAF VAN BADEN, 1750

The mad “Count of Baden” is one of the most celebrated tulips in all of history. Wildly ruffled and fringed and spiked with tiny spurs and horns, its swirling petals of gold, red, and green may remind you of molten lava cascading down a tropical mountainside. As always, we have very few bulbs, so don’t delay! (For other exceptionally rare parrots, see ‘Amiral’, ‘Cafe Brun’, and ‘Perfecta’.) Parrot, 16-18”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Last offered in 2014. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


Page 6 of Tulips: Lost?
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