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Daffodils: Lost Forever?

From America’s Expert Source for Heirloom Flower Bulbs
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Though preservation is our mission, bulbs drop out of our catalog every year.

Sometimes it’s because the harvest was too small. Sometimes it’s because they’re widely available elsewhere and don’t need our help. And sometimes it’s because we’ve lost our only known source due to severe weather (cold, drought, etc.), health problems (a debilitating stroke), or economic woes (small farmers are always at risk).

The good news is that, in time, we’re often able to return these bulbs to our catalog. So here’s a list of many we’ve offered in the past. For an alert the moment they’re available again, subscribe to our free email newsletter. Or to find a similar bulb, try our easy Advanced Bulb Search.


Fall-planted:     Crocus       Daffodils       Hyacinths       Lilies       Peonies       Tulips       Diverse

Spring-planted:     Cannas       Dahlias       Daylilies       Gladiolus       Iris       Diverse


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RARE POETS SOCIETY

With their wildflower grace, colorful “eyes,” and spicy perfume, daffodils bred from Narcissus poeticus were especially popular during the Arts and Crafts era of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Explore the simple elegance of 4 of the greatest of these all-but-lost poets: 1 ‘Horace’ (from 1894), 1 ‘Glory of Lisse’ (1901), 1 ‘Stilton’ (1909), and 1 ‘Cantabile’ (1932). For zones 4a-7a(9bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2016. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


SOUTHERN JONQUILS

Jonquils and Southern gardens go together like biscuits and gravy. We’ll send you 4 of the best, all easy, fragrant, and cherished – 3 N. jonquilla ‘Early Louisiana’, 3 true ‘Campernelle’, 3 ‘Sweetness’, and 3 ‘Trevithian’. 12 bulbs total, for zones 6b-8b(10bWC).

Last offered in 2016. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


ADMIRATION, 1912

With an amber-orange cup ringed by golden-white petals like “the soft taffeta silk which in the old days was known as sarsenet” (Wayside Gardens, 1936), this elegant poetaz is now one of the oldest of that hardy, cluster-flowered clan. And its fragrance is delicious! 8 Y-O 14-16”, zones 6a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2018. Our grower is increasing his stock and we hope to offer it again soon. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


ALBATROSS, 1891

With propeller-like petals and a frilled cup dipped in orange, this late Victorian treasure outshines its sibling ‘Seagull’ and was proudly described by the immortal Rev. Engleheart as “one of my finest and most brilliantly colored” creations. 3 W-YYO, late-mid, 18-20”, zones 4a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2019. Our grower is increasing his stock and we hope to offer it again soon. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


ANNE FRANK, 1959

Named for the girl whose indomitable spirit lives on in her immortal diary, this exceptionally rare double combines stainless white outer petals with a heart of deep, vibrant red-orange. It’s a dazzling daffodil – and a visual metaphor for Anne herself. 4 W-O, late-mid, 18-20”, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2018. Our grower is increasing his stock and we hope to offer it again soon. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


ARGENT, 1902

“The very best of all double daffodils”? Yes, according to the great E.A. Bowles who, in 1914, raved about its “particularly graceful outline” and the “charming mingling of its silver and gold.” With long white petals thrusting out of a flurry of short, bright, yellow ones, ‘Argent’ is bursting with spring’s exuberance. From a cross of ‘Ornatus’ and super-strong ‘Van Sion’. 4 W-Y, 14-16”, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2019. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


BERYL, 1907

In daffodil shows across the country, this graceful little shooting star wins more ribbons for Best Historic Daffodil than any other. Its up-swept petals mature from almost-buff to white, while its dainty golden cup is kissed with orange. In the 1930s, garden diva Louise Beebe Wilder praised it as “neat and charming.” 6 W-YYO, 12-14”, zones 5b-8a(10bWC), Holland. Last offered in 2006. We may offer it again periodically. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


BRILLIANCY, 1906

“This graceful beauty from the Arts-and-Crafts era has a special gift. Although many newer daffodils are much more “brilliant,” there’s something uncannily luminous about its sulphur-yellow petals and warm gold cup that will draw your eye from across the garden. It throws back its petals ever so slightly, too, as if to say exuberantly, “Ahhhh, spring!” 3 Y-YYO, 21-23”, zones 5a-8a(10aWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2017. Unfortunately we’ve lost our grower and haven’t found another yet who can guarantee true stock. We’ll keep searching, though, and hope to offer it again soon.


BUTTER AND EGGS, 1777

This charming name gets mistakenly applied to all sorts of double yellow daffodils, so let the buyer beware. Ours is the authentic Southern heirloom – hardy north to zone 5 – that’s been a folk favorite and passalong plant for centuries. Its soft yellow petals are interspersed with shorter ones of gold to almost orange, and even snooty William Robinson in The English Flower Garden praised it as “handsome and abundant.” Aka N. incomparabilis aurantius plenus, 4 Y-Y, 16-18”, zones 5b-8b(10bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2019. Our grower is increasing his stock and we hope to offer it in 2021. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


CAMELLIA, 1930

With its neatly layered petals of pale, dreamy, chiffon-yellow petals, this rare double daffodil really does look something like a camellia. It’s a sport of the legendary ‘Emperor’ and especially beautiful up close — which led connoisseur Michael Jefferson-Brown to name it one of the fifteen best daffodils for flower arrangers. 4 Y-Y, 18-20”, zones 5a-7b(9bWC), Holland. Last offered in 2019. Our grower is increasing his stock and we hope to offer it again soon. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


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