Home

Daffodils: Lost Forever?

From America’s Expert Source for Heirloom Flower Bulbs
My Basket
My Basket

Page 2 of Daffodils: Lost?
<< Previous  1 2 3 4 5 6 7  Next >>


CANTABILE, 1932

“The poeticus by which all others are judged,” says the great English daffodil grower Ron Scamp of this RHS AGM-winning classic with its sparkling petals and flawless form. For a special treat, pick it when it’s just opening and its eye is still (in the words of Michael Jefferson-Brown) “a lovely, cool mossy-green.” Pronounced “kahn-TAH-bih-lay,” 9 W-GYR, late, 18-20”, zones 4a-7a(9bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2016. Our grower is increasing his stock and we hope to offer it again soon. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


CASSANDRA, 1897

This very rare Victorian pheasant’s eye is another treasure from the illustrious Rev. Engleheart who gave the world ‘Beersheba’, ‘Lucifer’, ‘White Lady’, and many others. In 1905, the British Saturday Review praised its petals of “driven snow,” cup edged with “deep madder,” and “heart of pure green.” 9WC-GWYR, 18-20”, zones 4a-7a(9bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2018. Our grower is increasing his stock and we hope to offer it again soon. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


CHINITA, 1922

With a unique look and fabulous scent, ‘Chinita’ is the love child of a pheasant’s eye and a tazetta such as Avalanche. Its flat, ribbed, golden eye is circled with orange, but what really sets it apart are its pale amber-to-cream petals. From the moment it first bloomed for us, we wanted to share it with you! 8Y-YYR, 21-23”, zones 6a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2019. Our grower is increasing his stock and we hope to offer it again soon. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


COLLEEN BAWN, 1885

With its demure swan’s-neck pose and “high-shouldered” petals that arch forward to embrace the trumpet, this sweet little Victorian daffodil is close kin to N. moschatus and the classic “Silver Bells” daffodil that graces so many old Southern gardens. Its lilting Irish name was the title of one of the 19th century’s most popular plays. It means, fittingly, “fair-haired girl.” 1 W-W, 10-12”, zones 5b-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2014. Our grower is increasing his stock and we hope to offer it again soon. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


DREAMLIGHT, 1934

Looking like a platinum-blond pheasant’s-eye narcissus, ‘Dreamlight’ features a wide, flat, rippled eye of champagne-white that’s perfectly set off by a narrow ribbon of orange suffused with pink. Backed by round, moon-like petals, it’s ethereal, unique, and in 2009 it won the Wister Award, the American Daffodil Society’s highest honor! 3 W-GWR, 17-19”, late-blooming, zones 5a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2014. Unfortunately we’ve lost our grower and haven’t found another yet who can guarantee true stock. We’ll keep searching, though, and hope to offer it again soon.


EMPEROR, 1869

Any Top Ten list of history’s greatest daffodils would have to include this legendary trumpet. Once the world’s best-known and best-loved, it’s been “commercially extinct” for decades, preserved by just a handful of collectors — and we’re thrilled to have enough to offer it. With a deep gold trumpet and a distinctive wiggle to its softer yellow petals, it’s a daffodil for the ages. 1 Y-Y, 18-20”, zones 5a-8a(10bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2016. Our grower is increasing his stock and we hope to offer it again soon. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


EMPRESS, 1869

One of the most popular daffodils of all time, this landmark beauty helped spark the modern world’s love affair with daffodils when it was introduced alongside ‘Emperor’ just after the Civil War. With pure white petals and a slender yellow trumpet, it’s dewy fresh and eternally regal. Our 2009 Bulb of the Year, 1 W-Y, 18-20”, zones 5a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2012. Our grower is increasing his stock and we hope to offer it again soon. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


FEU DE JOIE, 1927

Introduced at the height of the Roaring Twenties, this free-spirited flower combines a dozen long, wavy outer petals with a crinkled center of orange and gold. Pronounced fə də JWAH, it was bred by the master of doubles, William Copeland, and named for a celebratory rifle salute known as the “fire of joy.” 4 W-O, 18-20”, early-mid season, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2019. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


FIREBIRD, 1940

Star-like ‘Firebird’ lights up the spring garden with its long, graceful petals rippling out from a heart of fire. One of the rarest daffodils we’ve ever offered, it’s one of only four introduced by Mrs. F. Stuart Foote of Grand Rapids, Michigan, who’s also credited with prompting her furniture-mogul husband to make the worlds first coffee table. 3 W-O, 18-20”, late-mid season, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. In 2016 our expert Dutch grower told us that he’s convinced this is actually the much older Firebrand.


FIREBRAND, 1897

With a fiery heart and long, creamy-white petals, ‘Firebrand’ lights up the spring garden like a shooting star. “Remarkable for the brilliant coloring of the prettily fluted cup,” wrote A.M. Kirby in 1907, and though the benchmarks for brilliance have changed since then, it’s still a graceful and remarkably beautiful flower. 3 WWY-R, 18-20”, early-mid, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2019. Our grower is increasing his stock and we hope to offer it in 2021. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


Page 2 of Daffodils: Lost?
<< Previous  1 2 3 4 5 6 7  Next >>