Order these fall-planted bulbs NOW for delivery in OCTOBER and NOVEMBER.

CLARA BUTT, 1889        Rarest & Web-Only
Once the world’s most popular tulip, gracing hundreds of catalog covers, this willowy, shell-pink beauty was lost to gardeners in 2007 when the last US grower finally gave it up. To save it, we sent 100 bulbs from his last harvest to our friends in Holland, and now there’s enough to share! Though bred from antique Flemish stock, ‘Clara’ was the prototypical 20th-century tulip – not feathered or flamed, not short and bright, but tall, late, pastel, and lovely. Learn more. Darwin/Single Late, 22”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC). Chart and care.
TU-05
3/$16
5/$25.50
Limit 5, please.
CLUSIANA, 1607        Rarest
A tulip for Mobile? Yes! And it’s hardy and multiplies in Boston and Denver, too! Although many sources offer this petite, charming wildflower, virtually all deliver cheap impostors such as hybrid ‘Lady Jane’ (oversized, and empty inside) or modern cream-to-yellow forms instead of the ancient rose and WHITE with its heart of deep, ravishing purple. Bill Finch of the Mobile Press-Register writes that in his garden our true clusiana has “come bursting out of the ground, each year better than the last.” It can do the same for you, in zones 6a-8b(10bWC), if you give it well-drained soil that’s relatively dry in summer. 10-14”, from Holland. Chart and care.
TU-25
3/$14
5/$22
10/$41.50
25/$94.50
50/$175
COTTAGE BOY, 1906        Rarest & Web-Only
It’s back! This spirited little tulip is a sport of ‘Cottage Maid’, a popular favorite since 1857. It’s bright and cheery but you’ll need to take a closer look to enjoy its full beauty – a painterly combination of orange “shaded carmine red” and yellow “flushed primrose and cream” (Barr and Sons, 1916). We love it when it opens wide in the sun, too. Single Early, 9-10”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Chart and care.
TU-914
1/$7
3/$19
5/$30
Limit 5, please.
COULEUR CARDINAL, 1845        
The best red tulip ever? Could be! It’s definitely the only tulip this old that’s still widely grown today. Generations have prized its rich color – red with a plum blush – and its fine habit – sturdy, weather-proof, and enduring. Isn’t it time you tried it? Triumph, 12”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.
TU-06
5/$9
10/$17
25/$39
50/$72
100/$133
DOM PEDRO, 1906        Rarest
This “coffee-brown, maroon-shaded” gem is “undoubtedly the most attractive of the brown tulips,” said the John Lewis Childs catalog in 1920 when tulips in so-called art shades such as bronze, terra-cotta, and mauve were the height of fashion. It’s certainly one of our favorites – and thanks to a bumper crop we’re offering it at our best price ever! Dutch Breeder/Single Late, 18-22”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. See our other brown tulips. Chart and care.
TU-934 5/$14 10/$26.50 25/$60.50 50/$112 SOLD OUT
DUCHESSE DE PARMA, 1820        Rarest & Web-Only
This exceptionally rare tulip is “bronze crimson bordered with orange,” according to the 1889 Rawson catalog. But most gardeners over the past 196 years would have seen it as simply red trimmed with yellow – one of the most popular color combinations in tulips since the very first were brought into Western gardens in the 1500s – and, as the 1865 Vick’s catalog described it, “splendid.” Single Early, 10-12”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Chart and care.
TU-952
1/$7
3/$19
5/$30
Limit 5, please.
DUC VAN TOL RED AND YELLOW, 1595        Rarest
If we had to choose a dozen landmark varieties to summarize the whole amazing history of tulips, this 400-year-old miniature would be one of them. Just 6 inches tall and extra early blooming, ‘Red and Yellow’ is the grandaddy of the ‘Duc van Tols’, a fabled clan of pixie tulips once grown in every garden and forced in pots for Christmas bloom. In front of purple hyacinths, its tiny flames are stunning. 6”, zones 4b-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Chart and care.
TU-69
1/$6.50
3/$18
5/$28
10/$52
Limit 10, please.
ELEGANS RUBRA, 1872        Rarest & Web-Only
With its almost savage beauty, this bright, dagger-petaled tulip was listed as a wild species in 19th-century catalogs. It’s never been found in the wild, though, and may be a survivor from the early 1700s when tulips much like it (and T. acuminata) ruled in the lavish gardens of the Ottoman Empire. Whatever its origins, it’s spectacular! Lily-flowered, 16”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Chart and care.
TU-81
3/$10
5/$16
10/$29.50
25/$67.50
50/$125
ELSIE ELOFF, 1949        Rarest & Web-Only
It’s back! This is not your ordinary yellow tulip! Variously described as “primrose-ivory” and “pale butter yellow,” this ethereal flower glows like moonlight in the garden. It combines beautifully with everything from lilacs to ‘Black Parrot’ to the first blooms of iris season, and if you’re like us, once you’ve tried it you’ll never want to garden without it. Single Late, 26-30”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.
TU-923
5/$10
10/$19
25/$43
50/$80
Limit 50, please.
ESTELLA RIJNVELD, 1954        
“Like raspberry-ripple ice cream,” says Anna Pavord in The Tulip, and “one of the best.” It’s also one of the most dramatic of modern parrots, with a whirling-dervish intensity that rivals that of much older parrots such as ‘Amiral de Constantinople’. I first grew ‘Estella’ 25 years ago, and the outrageous beauty of its first blooms still blazes in my memory. Aka ‘Gay Presto’, parrot, 18-20”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.
TU-919
5/$9.50
10/$18
25/$41
50/$76
100/$141
Page 2 of Tulips
  << Previous  1 2 3 4 5  Next >>
Loading