HYPERION, 1925        
Thousands of yellow daylilies have come and gone, but ‘Hyperion’ endures. Its fragrance, carefree vigor, and classic, lily-like flowers make it the only daylily from the early 1900s that’s still widely grown today. Indiana-bred and winner of an RHS AGM, it’s named for the Titan father of the sun god. 4 feet, zones 4a-8b(10aWC), Missouri. Last offered in spring 2009. Widely available elsewhere.
LOUISE RUSSELL, 1959        
At just two feet tall, this abundantly blooming, mid-century pink is perfect for small gardens or the front of the border. It’s a soft peachy pink with a lemon yellow throat, as cool and summery as pink lemonade pie. 18-24”, mid to late-mid, dormant, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from Missouri. Last offered in spring 2016. We plan to offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
LUTEOLA, 1900        Rarest
One of the oldest daylilies of all, and very hard to find today, this lightly fragrant beauty is the only daylily I was growing in my front yard – until we dug it up to share with you. (No problem!) It was bred by R. Wallace and Co., importers of some of the first daylilies from China, and praised in the June 1900 Country Life as “a Day Lily of great beauty, vigorous and handsome.” 26-32”, mid-summer, dormant, zones 5a-8a(10aWC), grown by us here in Ann Arbor. Last offered in spring 2017. We offer a rotating selection of daylilies. For an alert the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for our email newsletter.
MARSE CONNELL, 1952        
This exuberant daylily is one of our favorite reds. We like its long, pointed petals, its big, bright, star-like center, and that breeder Hooper Connell of Baton Rouge named it for his grandfather. 34-38”, mid, evergreen, zones 5a-8b(10bWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in spring 2017. We plan to offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
MELONEE, 1959        
With a name that’s pure 1950s, this luscious daylily looks like a cool, refreshing cantaloupe and ice cream smoothie. It was bred by Orville Fay of Illinois whose day job was working as a chemist in a candy factory. Just 26” tall, mid-summer blooming, dormant, zones 5a-8b(10aWC), from Missouri. Last offered in spring 2017. We plan to offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
MIKADO, 1929        Rarest
This striking daylily was one of Stout’s first and favorite introductions. Over the years its bold mango-and-mahogany coloring and graceful star-like form have won it many fans, including the great Elizabeth Lawrence who praised it as one of her “15 Best.” Vigorously multiplying and floriferous, it often reblooms in the fall in warm areas. 30-36”, early-mid season, semi-evergreen, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in spring 2016. We will offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
OPHIR, 1924        Rarest
Much more than just another yellow daylily, ‘Ophir’ has unusually long, trumpet-shaped flowers – almost like an Easter lily – making it one of the most graceful and distinctive daylilies we’ve ever seen. It’s also one of the first American-bred daylilies, by Bertrand Farr, and the great Elizabeth Lawrence grew it, writing in 1943 that it was “more beautiful than ever this season, and the only attention it has ever had is a mulch of cow manure each fall.” 38-46”, mid-season, semi-evergreen, zones 4a-8b(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in spring 2017. We offer a rotating selection of daylilies. For an alert the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for our email newsletter.
ORANGEMAN, 1902        Rarest
We can’t understand why everyone isn’t growing this great little daylily. It blooms remarkably early – with the first bearded iris of May – and profusely, even in the half-shade of our old grape arbor. Its graceful, star-like flowers are a cheery yellow-orange that’s somewhere between mangoes and California poppies. And it’s one of the oldest survivors from the very dawn of daylily breeding, by school teacher George Yeld. 24-30”, dormant, zones 4a-8b(10bWC), from Missouri. Last offered in spring 2017. We plan to offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
PAINTED LADY, 1942        
“I may be old-fashioned,” writes daylily connoisseur Sydney Eddison, but this “big handsome daylily with flowers the color of orange marmalade is still a striking plant.” Others call its abundant flowers “bronze orange” or even “cinnamon,” but everyone seems to agree that this vigorous, drought-tolerant, Stout Medal winner is far from ordinary. 36” mid-summer blooming, evergreen in warm zones, zones 5a-8b(10aWC), from Missouri. Last offered in spring 2011. We may offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
PORT, 1941        
We love how profusely this charming little daylily blooms, and how its small, rusty red flowers glow warmly in the summer sun. Bred by the great A.B. Stout, it was named by globe-trotting “lady botanist” Mary Gibson Henry in memory of her youngest son, Porteous. 30-36”, early-mid to mid, semi-evergreen, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in spring 2016. We’re building up stock and plan to offer it again in the future. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
Page 2 of Daylilies: Lost?
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