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We’re constantly searching for great old bulbs to add to our catalog. (Email us your suggestions!) Here’s what we’re offering for the first time – or after a hiatus – in 2023.


Melonee
Melonee, 1959
Gertrude Condon
Gertrude Condon, 1956
Winsome Lady
Winsome Lady, 1964
Otto’s Thrill
Otto’s Thrill, 1958
Challenger
Challenger, 1949
Small World
Small World, 1976
Black Friar
Black Friar, 1951
pallida Dalmatica
pallida Dalmatica, 1597
Honorabile
Honorabile, 1840

New (or Back) for SPRING Planting

DAHLIA

Blithe Spirit dahlia, 1962 – Eye-catching bursts of red and white
Emory Paul dahlia, 1962 – Gigantic rosy purple blossoms
Kasasagi dahlia, 1959 – Glowing pompons of yellow and orange
Otto’s Thrill dahlia, 1958 – Classic and elegant rose-pink
Small World dahlia, 1976 – Adorable, petite white pompons
Tartan dahlia, 1951 – So many combinations of burgundy and white!

DAYLILY

August Pioneer daylily, 1939 – 8 weeks of bloom
Bette Russel daylily, 1956 – Rich lemony yellow open in the evenings.
Black Friar daylily, 1951 – velvety, wine-dark petals
Challenger daylily, 1949 – to five feet tall or more
Evelyn Claar daylily, 1949 – ground-breaking pink
Gertrude Condon daylily, 1956 – Glows golden-orange.
Marse Connell daylily, 1952 – one of our favorite reds
Melonee daylily, 1959 – luscious summer dessert
Purple Waters daylily, 1942 – Regal, dark-red/burgundy flowers.
Winsome Lady daylily, 1964 – Fragrant blush-pink blossoms with green throats.

IRIS

Alcazar iris, 1910 – magnificent and ground breaking
Colonel Candelot iris, 1907 – the “reddest” of its era
Crimson King iris, 1893 – Victorian rebloomer in rich claret
Flavescens iris, 1813 – pale, shimmering yellow
Honorabile iris, 1840 – perky favorite of the pioneers
Indian Chief iris, 1929 – wine-red, raspberry, and bronze
Madame Chereau iris, 1844 – landmark iris, our Spring 2009 Bulb of the Year
Monsignor iris, 1907 – violet and deep claret, by Vilmorin-Andrieux
Mrs. George Darwin iris, 1895 – elegant, bouquet-sized white
pallida Dalmatica iris, 1597 – grape-scented, the quintessential iris
Plumeri iris, 1888 – coppery rose and velvety claret
Queen of May iris, 1859 – Victorian “pink”
Small is Beautiful sampler – 3 charming iris for the front of the border
Wyomissing iris, 1909 – one of the very first American-bred iris

New (or Back) for FALL Planting

DAFFODIL

Bath’s Flame daffodil, 1913 – one of Ron Scamp’s three favorites
Cassandra daffodil, 1897 – rare Victorian pheasant’s-eye
Doctor Alex Fleming daffodil, 1948 – Center is an exuberant ruffled skirt of frills and ruffles.
Dreamlight daffodil, 1934 – champagne eye, apricot rim
Horace daffodil, 1894 – poet of carpe diem
Inglescombe daffodil, 1912 – a double helping of sunlight
La Riante daffodil, 1931 – Sweetly scented “laughing girl.”
Laurens Koster daffodil, 1906 – pioneering poetaz
Little Witch daffodil, 1921 – cute, very cute
Lucifer daffodil, 1890 – heavenly wings, devilish cup
Seagull daffodil, 1893 – floats like a butterfly, apricot rim
Sir Watkin daffodil, 1868 – one of the all-time greats
Twin Sisters daffodil, 1597 – aka Loving Couples, Cemetery Ladies

DIVERSE FALL

Katharine Hodgkins, 1955 – Vigorous light blue & yellow reticulated iris; fragrant.
Magnet snowdrop, 1889 – “easily recognized, even from a distance”

HYACINTH

Bismarck hyacinth, 1875 – long-lived perennial
Double Yellow, Ophir hyacinth, 1827? – the world’s only double yellow
Dreadnought hyacinth, 1899 – curly-petalled double, extra rare
Fondant hyacinth, 1983 – Sweet pure pink/ returns well.
Grand Blanche Imperiale hyacinth, 1798 – blush-white, 18th-century relic
Grand Monarque hyacinth, 1863 – lost and now found
King of the Blues hyacinth, 1863 – distinctively slim and dark
L’Innocence hyacinth, 1863 – pure white, easiest to force
Menelik hyacinth, 1911 – black and beautiful
Minos hyacinth, 1980 – Unusual color varies from blue through lilac-blue.
Mulberry Rose hyacinth, 1946 – raspberry ice cream
Queen of the Blues hyacinth, 1870 – soft, silvery blue
Roman Dark Blue hyacinth, 1597 – from the UK National Collection
Splendid Cornelia hyacinth, 1984 – Alan Shipp favorite: “a lovely lilac” color.

PEONY

Auten’s Pride peony, 1933 – soft pink with lavender undertones
Brand’s Magnificent peony, 1918 – “the nearest blue of any red peony”
Couronne d’Or peony, 1873 – gold-crowned, hard to find
Gay Paree peony, 1933 – showy enough for the Folies Bergère
Henry Sass peony, 1948 – “truly magnificent”
James R. Mann peony, 1920 – striped buds, lotus-like flowers
Monsieur Jules Elie peony, 1888 – “absolutely dependable,” even in the South
Nick Shaylor peony, 1931 – “the near perfect peony”
Sword Dance peony, 1933 – Japanese-style Award of Garden Merit winner
Victoire de la Marne peony, 1915 – a favorite of European florists
Walter Faxon peony, 1904 – luscious peach-tinted pink

TULIP

Blue Parrot tulip, 1927 – sophisticated star of JFK’s Rose Garden
Cottage Maid tulip, 1857 – rose and white sweetheart
Dom Pedro tulip, 1906 – “undoubtedly the most attractive” brown tulip
Duc van Tol Scarlet tulip, 1850 – perfect miniature
Julia Farnese tulip, 1853 – “supremely elegant” broken tulip
Rosamunde Huykman tulip, 1895 – like a pink and white sunrise
Silver Standard tulip, 1760 – dazzling red on white