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Daylilies: Lost Forever?

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POTENTATE, 1943

With its red-violet undertones, this Stout Medal winner was an exciting color advance for its time, and although no one today would describe it as “pansy purple,” it’s still a striking flower. And potent – it often develops small plantlets called proliferations on its bloom stalks which you can root and grow into new plants! 36-42”, mid to late-mid, deciduous, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in 2016. We’re building up stock and plan to offer it again in the future. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


PRINCESS IRENE, 1952

One of the latest, longest-blooming, and brightest daylilies we grow, ‘Princess Irene’ will draw you from across the garden with its joyful brilliance, from mid-summer well into fall. With its star-like form and almost wriggling petals, it’s the only daylily ever introduced by H. A. Zager of Des Moines – but he sure picked a winner. 28-34”, late-mid to late, deciduous, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in 2016. We’re building up stock and plan to offer it again in the future. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


ROYAL BEAUTY, 1947New

Bred by Ophelia “Bright” Taylor, winner of the AHS’s highest award for hybridizers, this purple-shaded, wine-colored daylily has slender petals curling back gracefully from a vivid yellow throat. It’s been a favorite oldie of our Missouri growers for over 40 years thanks to its “rich color, recurved petals, and beautiful foliage.” 34-36”, mid-season, semi-evergreen, zones 5a-9a(10aWC), from Missouri. Last offered in 2019. We offer a rotating selection of daylilies. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


SOVEREIGN, 1906

Small-flowered, early blooming, and one of the oldest daylilies of all, this cheery little queen is lemon yellow lightly shaded with chestnut on back. It was bred from the wild lemon lily and H. dumortierii by George Yeld, the founding father of daylilies, and it blooms today – as it has for decades – in the restored garden of Mississippi author Eudora Welty. Yellower and taller than its sibling ‘Gold Dust’, 28-30”, deciduous, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in 2015. We’re building up stock and plan to offer it again in the future. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


VESPERS, 1941

Unlike most daylilies that wane as night approaches, this pale yellow beauty opens late in the day and then stays fresh and beautiful all evening — when you’re home to enjoy it — and the following day. It was bred by the remarkable Elizabeth Nesmith who hybridized hundreds of daylilies, iris, and other perennials and sold them by mail, in an era when ladies just didn’t do things like that. Often reblooms, 34-38”, early-mid, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in spring 2015. Due to our very limited growing space, we may not offer it again – but if you’re dying to have it, please email us.


YELLOWSTONE, 1950

What sets this mighty classic apart — and why should you give it a try? It’s more fragrant than its famous parent ‘Hyperion’. Its Chicago breeding makes it extra tough. And its lily-like, moonlight-yellow flowers stay open longer than most, making it especially beautiful in the evening garden — when you’ll be home to enjoy it. 36” mid-summer blooming, deciduous, zones 4a-8b(9aWC), from Missouri. Last offered in 2011. We offer a rotating selection of daylilies. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


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