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Daylilies: Lost Forever?

From America’s Expert Source for Heirloom Flower Bulbs
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Though preservation is our mission, bulbs drop out of our catalog every year.

Sometimes it’s because the harvest was too small. Sometimes it’s because they’re widely available elsewhere and don’t need our help. And sometimes it’s because we’ve lost our only known source due to severe weather (cold, drought, etc.), health problems (a debilitating stroke), or economic woes (small farmers are always at risk).

The good news is that, in time, we’re often able to return these bulbs to our catalog. So here’s a list of many we’ve offered in the past. For an alert the moment they’re available again, subscribe to our free email newsletter. Or to find a similar bulb, try our easy Advanced Bulb Search.


Fall-planted:     Crocus       Daffodils       Hyacinths       Lilies       Peonies       Tulips       Diverse

Spring-planted:     Cannas       Dahlias       Daylilies       Gladiolus       Iris       Diverse


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APRICOT, 1893Rarest

Here’s the beginning of daylilies as we know them today. Introduced in 1893 by schoolteacher George Yeld, ‘Apricot’ was the first hybrid daylily and its success opened the door for the 60,000 others that have followed. Spring-blooming (starting in early May here in zone 6a) and often reblooming in the fall, it has vivid little flowers of orange-yellow peeking above a fountain of leaves — making it well worth growing even if it weren’t so historic. 28-34”, early, deciduous, zones 4a-8b(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in 2015 and we hope to offer this variety again someday. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


AUTUMN RED, 1941

True stock! Like that energetic rabbit, ‘Autumn Red’ keeps going and going and going, blooming for weeks on end from mid-summer on. Its slender, gracefully curling petals are cherry red with sunny yellow midribs for a look that’s exuberant but never too much. You’ll wish it bloomed even longer! 36-40”, deciduous, zones 4a-8b(9bWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in 2014. We offer a rotating selection of daylilies. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


BLACK FALCON, 1941Web-Only & It’s Back!

Back in the day, ‘Black Falcon’ was celebrated as the darkest daylily of all, and 70 years later it’s still a stunner. A glowing center of molten gold makes its rippled, mahogany-red petals seem even darker. It’s free-flowering, easy-growing, mid-summer blooming, 32-36”, deciduous, for zones 4a-8b(10aWC), from Missouri. Last offered in 2019. We offer a rotating selection of daylilies. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


BLACK FRIAR, 1951It’s Back!

With its velvety, wine-dark petals, chartreuse throat, and graceful, lily-like form, ‘Black Friar’ is one of the best of the mid-century “black” daylilies. Tall and vigorous, it was bred by the first woman to win the AHS’s top award for hybridizing, “Sun-Proof” Mary Lester of Georgia. 38-40”, mid-to-late, deciduous, zones 4a-8b(10aWC), from Missouri. Last offered in 2018. We offer a rotating selection of daylilies. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


CABALLERO, 1941

‘Caballero’s long, curling petals are gold and an intriguing rusty brown (yes, brown!) that may remind you of saddle-leather and sandstone buttes – which is probably just what Stout had in mind when he named it. Caballeros were the noble “gentlemen-cowboys” of popular movies such as The Bold Caballero of 1936 with its dashing hero, Zorro. 36-40”, early-mid season, evergreen, zones 4a-8b(10bWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in 2016 and we hope to offer this variety again in 2021. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


CHALLENGER, 1949

This dramatically tall, colorful daylily will draw your eye from the farthest reaches of your garden. It gets its height – five feet or more here – from H. altissima, native to the mountains of Nanjing, and with 25-30 buds per stem, its striking red flowers will entertain you from mid-summer into fall. By A.B. Stout, 48-72”, deciduous, zones 4a-8b(10bWC), from from Missouri. Last offered in 2018. We offer a rotating selection of daylilies. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


CIRCE, 1937

With charming, not-so-big flowers of a lemon yellow that’s both soft and bright, this rarely offered Depression-era beauty mingles easily with other perennials and adds a cooling note to the mid-summer garden. It was bred by the master A.B. Stout himself who liked it so well that he named it for Odysseus’s enchantress, the “loveliest of all immortals.” Long-blooming, 36-42”, mid-summer blooming, deciduous, zones 4a-8b(9bWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in 2018. We offer a rotating selection of daylilies. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


CRIMSON PIRATE, 1951It’s Back!

With up to 30 buds per stem, this Nebraska-bred classic will brighten your mid-summer garden with six weeks of star-like, jewel-toned blossoms that are as graceful as wildflowers. Named for a hit movie that later inspired Pirates of the Caribbean, it’s another masterpiece from the great Henry Sass whose family introduced so many enduringly popular iris and peonies. 30-32”, mid-season, deciduous, zones 4a-8b(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in 2019. We offer a rotating selection of daylilies. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


EVELYN CLAAR, 1949It’s Back!

One of the best of the ground-breaking mid-century pinks, ‘Evelyn’ is a warm, peachy-pink highlighted by a glowing, golden throat. Free-flowering and vigorous, it was bred by University of Chicago botany professor Ezra Kraus – who clearly knew what he was doing. 24-30”, early-mid, deciduous, zones 4a-8b(10aWC), from Missouri. Last offered in 2019. We offer a rotating selection of daylilies. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


GOLD DUST, 1905It’s Back!

Exceptionally early-blooming, this cheery little daylily opens its fragrant, cinnamon-shaded flowers just as spring is turning into summer (and when it’s happy, it often reblooms). It’s also one of the oldest daylilies, by the very first person to breed them, English schoolteacher George Yeld, who crossed the classic lemon lily with the Japanese H. dumortieri to get this enduring charmer. Just 24-26”, very early, deciduous, zones 5a-8b(10bWC), Missouri. Last offered in 2019. We offer a rotating selection of daylilies. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.


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