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Bulbs on Sale

From America’s Expert Source for Heirloom Flower Bulbs
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It’s Not Too Late! Save on these Fall-Planted Beauties

It’s hard to predict exactly how many bulbs we’ll need six months to a year in advance, and when our growers offer us more of their rare treasures, we hate to say no. That’s good news for you because the following bulbs are now on sale! They’re going fast, though, so don’t delay!

Sampler

Crocus Tapestry – early spring treats – Save 20%
Doubles Delight – bursting with extra petals – Save 10%
Easter Basket Hyacinths – 5 richly favorite singles – Save 10%
Intro to Heirlooms 6Save 10%
Intro to Heirlooms, Fall – our most popular sampler! – Save 10%
Peony Paradise – a lifetime of easy, luxurious beauty – Save 10%
Tulip Diversity – 3 fragrant, 3 wild, 3 double, & 3 parrots – Save 20%
Woodland Sprites – sweet little wildflowers – Save 20%

Crocus

Blue Pearl, 1950 – from the godfather of snow crocus – Save 25%
Cloth of Gold, 1587 – bees flock to this “Turkey crocus” – Save 15%
Cream Beauty, 1943 – like proper Jersey cream – Save 15%
Jeanne d’Arc, 1943 – multiple award winner – Save 10%
King of the Striped, 1880 – charmingly imperfect Victorian – Save 10%
Roseus, 1924 – the world’s PINKEST crocus – Save 30%
Vanguard, 1934 – platinum and amethyst – Save 30%
tommies, 1847 – lavender self-sower – Save 15%

Daffodil

Bantam, 1950 – bright little AGM-winner – Save 10%
Croesus, 1912 – gold and silver coins – Save 15%
Daphne, 1914 – ADS 2008 Best Historic Daffodil – Save 15%
Double Campernelle, 1601 – perfect “roses” – Save 15%
Early Pearl, 1899 – early, fragrant, and luminous – Save 15%
Firetail, 1910 – is its cup truly RED? – Save 25%
Geranium, 1930 – 2016 Wister Award winner! – Save 15%
Glory of Lisse, 1901 – one of the finest poets – Save 30%
Grand Primo, 1780 – most vigorous and floriferous – Save 10%
Maximus, Trumpet Major, 1576 – loved for over 400 years! – Save 10%
Minor Monarque, 1809 – N. x italicus, long-petalled and star-like – Save 10%
Rip van Winkle, 1884 – spiked cutie – Save 15%
Stilton, 1909 – from the Golden Age of pheasant’s-eyes – Save 10%
Sun Disc, 1946 – circular shape and highest honors – Save 15%
Thalia, 1916 – dove-like classic – Save 10%
Van Sion, 1620 – vigorous multiplier, iconic double – Save 10%
W.P. Milner, 1869 – spiraling petals of soft, silvery primrose – Save 15%
White Lady, 1897 – Victorian lady with a parasol – Save 10%
Xit, 1948 – Game of Thones, anyone? – Save 25%

Diverse Fall

Atkinsii snowdrop, 1869 – elegant “pear-shaped pearl” – Save 20%
Elwes or giant snowdrop, 1875 – blooms very early, animal-proof – Save 15%
English bluebell, 1200 – direct from England – Save 15%
German garlic, 1800 – butterfly favorite – Save 15%
Gravetye Giant snowflake, 1596 – clusters of white bells – Save 15%
Siberian squill, 1796 – amazingly blue – Save 20%
Southern grape hyacinth, 1629 – midnight blue & heat-loving – Save 20%
antique freesia, 1878 – super fragrant naturalizer – Save 10%
blue Grecian windflower, 1854 – cheap, easy, and “one of the loveliest flowers” – Save 20%
jack-in-the-pulpit, 1664 – shade-loving favorite – Save 10%
silver bells, 1629 – subtle, elegant, Quakerish – Save 20%
snake’s-head fritillary, 1572 – checkered! – Save 10%
sternbergia, 1596 – crocus-like fall-bloomer – Save 15%
white Grecian windflower, 1854 – “dazzling” award-winner – Save 10%
white Spanish bluebell, 1601 – easy and luminous – Save 20%

Hyacinth

Anna Liza, 1972 – pink/lavender/mauve and beautiful! – Save 20%
Mulberry Rose, 1946 – raspberry ice cream – Save 25%
Roman Blue, 1562 – wildflowery, and it multiplies! – Save 10%
Roman Dark Blue, 1597 – from the UK National Collection – Save 10%
Roman Pink, 1573 – wildflowery, pink, and wonderful – Save 25%
Roman White, 1597 – the rarest Roman of all – Save 25%

Lily

Black Beauty, 1957 – “indestructible” Hall of Famer – Save 10%
White Henryi, 1945 – Hall of Fame masterpiece – Save 10%
regal lily, 1905 – fragrant and easy – Save 15%
tiger lily, double, 1870 – delightfully odd – Save 10%

Peony

Duchesse de Nemours, 1856 – “creamy chalices” to perfect white clouds – Save 10%
Edulis Superba, 1824 – one of the oldest and most fragrant – Save 10%
Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1932 – like a soft pink waterlily – Save 10%
Rubra Plena, 1568 – classic Memorial Day “piney” – Save 10%
Sword Dance, 1933 – Japanese-style Award of Garden Merit winner – Save 25%
Victoire de la Marne, 1915 – a favorite of European florists – Save 20%
fern-leaf peony, 1765 – thread-like foliage, extra early – Save 20%

Tulip

Black Parrot, 1937 – exuberantly ruffled and frilled – Save 10%
Elegans Rubra, 1872 – stark simplicity – Save 15%
Estella Rijnveld, 1954 – raspberry-ripple ice cream – Save 20%
Garden Party, 1944 – vivid rose and white – Save 20%
Generaal de Wet, 1904 – deliciously fragrant – Save 10%
Groenland, 1955 – exceptionally long-lasting – Save 15%
Keizerskroon, 1750 – “magnificent for any purpose” – Save 15%
Kingsblood, 1952 – vibrant red and late-blooming – Save 25%
Mariette, 1942 – graceful pink award-winner – Save 10%
Maureen, 1950 – “unsurpassed even after all these years.” – Save 15%
Orange King, 1903 – “sweet-scented, a grand tulip” – Save 15%
Prince of Austria, 1860 – fragrant and enduring – Save 10%
Prinses Irene, 1949 – unusual colors and rich fragrance – Save 10%
Queen of Night, 1940 – looks good with everything – Save 15%
Rococo, 1942 – “one of the craziest” parrots – Save 10%
White Triumphator, 1942 – elegant favorite of Ryan Gainey – Save 15%
Willemsoord, 1930 – double, ruffled, carmine-rose and pearl – Save 10%
acuminata, 1816 – “spidery and mad” – Save 10%