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Heirlooms New This Year

From America’s Expert Source for Heirloom Flower Bulbs
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We’re constantly searching for great old bulbs to add to our catalog. (Email us your suggestions!) Here’s what we’re offering for the first time – or after a hiatus – in 2020.


New (or Back) for SPRING Planting

DAHLIA

Arab Queen dahlia, 1949 – a whirlwind of autumn leaves
Glorie van Noordwijk dahlia, 1969 – soft sand and sun
Mrs. H. Brown dahlia, 1947 – love-child of the ‘Bishop’ & ‘Clair’
Princesse Louise de Suede dahlia, 1947 – chic, indescribable color
Roxy dahlia, 1964 – short, dark-leaved, and vibrant

DAYLILY

Annette daylily, 1945 – spunky little redhead
August Pioneer daylily, 1939 – 8 weeks of bloom
Autumn Minaret daylily, 1951 – up to 7 feet tall!
Baggette daylily, 1945 – cool lemon and old rose
Corky daylily, 1959 – sweet little flower with famous friends
Luteola daylily, 1900 – my front yard daylily
Luxury Lace daylily, 1959 – melon-colored Stout Medal winner
Marse Connell daylily, 1952 – one of our favorite reds
Orangeman daylily, 1902 – mango-colored stars, extra old
Salmon Sheen daylily, 1950 – Stout Medal winner
Theron daylily, 1934 – dark landmark

GLADIOLUS

Dauntless gladiolus, 1940 – Lauren Bacall in pink

IRIS

Alcazar iris, 1910 – magnificent and ground breaking
Coronation iris, 1927 – the perfect yellow iris?
Crimson King iris, 1893 – Victorian rebloomer in rich claret
Demi-Deuil iris, 1912 – once called “the black and white iris”
Indian Chief iris, 1929 – wine-red, raspberry, and bronze
Loreley iris, 1909 – perfectly imperfect charmer
Mrs. Horace Darwin iris, 1888 – elegant white
Quaker Lady iris, 1909 – smoky lavender and fawn
Swerti iris, 1612 – from the gardens of Emperor Rudolf II
Wabash iris, 1936 – vibrant Dykes Medal-winning iris

New (or Back) for FALL Planting

DAFFODIL

Anne Frank daffodil, 1959 – with a vibrant heart, like Anne herself
Cassandra daffodil, 1897 – rare Victorian pheasant’s-eye
Feu de Joie daffodil, 1927 – free-spirited semi-double
Keats daffodil, 1968 – the weirdest daffodil we’ve ever grown
Lucifer daffodil, 1890 – heavenly wings, devilish cup
Scarlet Gem daffodil, 1910 – fragrant, charming, and Cornwall-bred
Seagull daffodil, 1893 – floats like a butterfly, apricot rim
Will Scarlett daffodil, 1898 – dazzling groundbreaker

DIVERSE FALL

Magnet snowdrop, 1889 – “easily recognized, even from a distance”

PEONY

Adolphe Rousseau peony, 1890 – dark and satiny
Auten’s Pride peony, 1933 – soft pink with lavender undertones
Festiva Maxima peony, 1851 – best-loved for over a century
Gay Paree peony, 1933 – showy enough for the Folies Bergère
Hermione peony, 1932 – richly fragrant, apple-blossom pink
Philippe Rivoire peony, 1911 – rose-scented legend

TULIP

Cottage Boy tulip, 1906 – spirited and painterly
Cottage Maid tulip, 1857 – rose and white sweetheart
Duc van Tol Rose tulip, 1700 – tiny pink and white ballerina
Duc van Tol Violet tulip, 1700 – ancient pixie
Grandma’s Jewel Box sampler – cheery jumble of late-spring tulips
Julia Farnese tulip, 1853 – “supremely elegant” broken tulip
La Harpe tulip, 1863 – named for an early explorer of Texas?
Le Mogol tulip, 1913 – rose blushed with bronze
Pottebakker White tulip, 1840 – pure, bold, & popular
Van der Neer tulip, 1860 – rosy-purple, Civil-War-era favorite
White Hawk, Albion tulip, 1880 – luminous and robust