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Heirlooms New This Year

From America’s Expert Source for Heirloom Flower Bulbs
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We’re constantly searching for great old bulbs to add to our catalog. (Email us your suggestions!) Here’s what we’re offering for the first time – or after a hiatus – in 2021.


New (or Back) for SPRING Planting

DAHLIA

Bloodstone dahlia, 1939 – as brilliant as the ancient gem
Blue Danube dahlia, 1948 – mysterious, bluish lilac
Gerrie Hoek dahlia, 1942 – “most popular dahlia of all time”
Kaiser Wilhelm dahlia, 1881 – lemon and burgundy, green button eye
Klankstad Kerkrade dahlia, 1954 – spiky poofs of primrose
Little Beeswing dahlia, 1909 – flame and yellow honeycomb
Lutt Wichen dahlia, 1941 – gardenia-flowered “ground-cover” dahlia
Princesse Louise de Suede dahlia, 1947 – chic, indescribable color
Sterling Silver dahlia, 1960 – like a bright, silvery moon
Union Jack dahlia, 1882 – candy-striped Victorian
White Fawn dahlia, 1942 – cool and refreshing
Willo Violet dahlia, 1937 – purple gumballs

DAYLILY

Black Friar daylily, 1951 – velvety, wine-dark petals
Caballero daylily, 1941 – Zorro’s favorite
Challenger daylily, 1949 – to five feet tall or more
Circe daylily, 1937 – cool lemon yellow classic by Stout
Evelyn Claar daylily, 1949 – ground-breaking pink
Libby Finch daylily, 1949 – black cherry, white star
Melonee daylily, 1959 – luscious summer dessert
Mikado daylily, 1929 – graceful mango and mahogany
Neyron Rose daylily, 1950 – raspberry-rose with ivory highlighting
Princess Irene daylily, 1952 – late, long-blooming, & brilliant
Rosalind daylily, 1941 – the first red, wild from China
lemon lily daylily, 1570 – fragrant daylily, true stock!

IRIS

Caprice iris, 1898 – “I smell ripe grapes!”
Colonel Candelot iris, 1907 – the “reddest” of its era
Flavescens iris, 1813 – pale, shimmering yellow
Germanica iris, 1500 – from Rome to Van Gogh
Gracchus iris, 1884 – short, great for perennial borders
Honorabile iris, 1840 – perky favorite of the pioneers
Lavandulacea iris, 1854 – this spring only!
Monsignor iris, 1907 – violet and deep claret, by Vilmorin-Andrieux
Mrs. George Darwin iris, 1895 – elegant, bouquet-sized white
Plumeri iris, 1888 – coppery rose and velvety claret
Queen of May iris, 1859 – Victorian “pink”
Wyomissing iris, 1909 – one of the very first American-bred iris

New (or Back) for FALL Planting

DAFFODIL

Anne Frank daffodil, 1959 – with a vibrant heart, like Anne herself
Butter and Eggs daffodil, 1777 – the classic cottage-garden double
Cassandra daffodil, 1897 – rare Victorian pheasant’s-eye
Early Pearl daffodil, 1899 – early, fragrant, and luminous
Firebrand daffodil, 1897 – long creamy petals, fiery heart
Horace daffodil, 1894 – poet of carpe diem
Inglescombe daffodil, 1912 – a double helping of sunlight
Keats daffodil, 1968 – the weirdest daffodil we’ve ever grown
Little Witch daffodil, 1921 – cute, very cute
Twin Sisters daffodil, 1597 – aka Loving Couples, Cemetery Ladies
Will Scarlett daffodil, 1898 – dazzling groundbreaker

PEONY

Duchesse de Nemours peony, 1856 – “creamy chalices” to perfect white clouds
Edulis Superba peony, 1824 – one of the oldest and most fragrant
Minuet peony, 1931 – ‘Mrs. Roosevelt’s beautiful sister
Rubra Plena peony, 1568 – classic Memorial Day “piney”
fern-leaf peony, 1765 – thread-like foliage, extra early

TULIP

Cottage Boy tulip, 1906 – spirited and painterly
Cottage Maid tulip, 1857 – rose and white sweetheart
Duc van Tol Rose tulip, 1700 – tiny pink and white ballerina
Duc van Tol Violet tulip, 1700 – ancient pixie
Grandma’s Jewel Box sampler – cheery jumble of late-spring tulips
Le Mogol tulip, 1913 – rose blushed with bronze
Pottebakker White tulip, 1840 – pure, bold, & popular
Van der Neer tulip, 1860 – rosy-purple, Civil-War-era favorite
White Hawk, Albion tulip, 1880 – luminous and robust