Though preservation is our mission, bulbs drop out of our catalog every year.

Sometimes it’s because the harvest was too small. Sometimes it’s because they’re widely available elsewhere and don’t need our help. And sometimes it’s because we’ve lost our only known source due to severe weather (cold, drought, etc.), health problems (a debilitating stroke), or economic woes (small farmers are always at risk).

The good news is that, in time, we’re often able to return these bulbs to our catalog. So here’s a list of many we’ve offered in the past. For an alert the moment they’re available again, subscribe to our free email newsletter. Or to find a similar bulb, try our easy Advanced Bulb Search.

Fall-planted:     Crocus       Daffodils       Hyacinths       Lilies       Peonies       Tulips       Diverse

Spring-planted:     Cannas       Dahlias       Daylilies       Gladiolus       Iris       Diverse

ALCAZAR, 1910        
This famous iris is not only magnificently handsome, it’s also “a survivor par excellence,” to quote expert Cameron Hall, growing vigorously in old gardens and forgotten places from coast to coast. Introduced by Vilmorin of France, it was one of the first tetraploids, setting a ground-breaking new standard – taller, larger-flowered, and richly colored – for 20th-century iris. 38-40”, zones 3-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in spring 2016. We’re building up stock and will offer it again sometime in the future. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
COLONEL CANDELOT, 1907        
With velvety falls of deep oxblood to burgundy, this small-flowered French iris was the “reddest” of its era, and it’s still a knockout today. Strong-growing and floriferous with a light fragrance that’s been compared to honey locust, it’s an iris that, as Lee Bonnewitz wrote in his 1926 catalog, “I believe all American iris lovers will be glad to own.” 30-32”, zones 3-8a(10bWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in spring 2015. We plan to offer it again in 2018. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
CORONATION, 1927        
The perfect yellow iris? Could be! It’s not too pale, not too bright, tough enough to thrive in total neglect, and it blooms and blooms – often after all the other iris here in our micro-farms have called it quits for the season. Introduced by Agnes Moore of tiny Benton, Illinois, it has become, in the words of iris expert Mike Unser, “truly an iris classic.” 28-36”, zones 3-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in spring 2016. We plan to offer it again in 2018. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
CRIMSON KING, 1893        
The deep, almost iridescent red-purple of this fragrant iris – which cameras fail to capture – dazzled the world when it was first introduced by the legendary Peter Barr. Its blooms are often the first of iris season, and in zone-6 and warmer gardens it often reblooms in the fall. In fact, it’s become “ubiquitous in coastal California,” writes Clarence Mahan in Classic Irises, “where its reblooming habit has given it a place in the hearts and flower beds of generations of gardeners.” Just 22-26” tall, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in spring 2016. We plan to offer it again in 2018. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
DAUNTLESS, 1929        
With velvety petals of burgundy and rose, ‘Dauntless’ is one of the oldest and best of the so-called “red” irises. It was introduced by Nashville’s Clarence Connell in 1929, beating out ‘Indian Chief’ to win the Dykes Medal as the year’s finest iris. On “tall heavy stems,” its luxurious blooms “last over a long season” (Cooley’s, 1937). 34-38”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in spring 2014. We’re building up stock and hope to offer it again someday. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
FLUTTER-BY, 1924        
With its lower petals held out at a jaunty angle, this profusely blooming little iris really does have the look of a host of butterflies. It was bred by the remarkable Grace Sturtevant of Massachusetts, a trained artist and “the world’s first woman plant hybridizer” (Mahan, 2007). Unfortunately, due to our very limited growing space we may not offer this little charmer again, so get it while you can! 24-26”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in spring 2016. We’re building up stock to offer it again sometime in the future. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
FRANCHEVILLE, 1927        
By Ferdinand Cayeux, perhaps the greatest iris breeder of all time, this big, stately iris features pale, rippled standards of lilac and fawn over falls of deep, velvety maroon shading to violet. Our stock of this rarity is very limited, and it will be years before we can offer it again, so get it while you can! 38-46”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in spring 2015. Unfortunately due to our limited growing space, we don’t expect to offer it again. Sorry!
FRANK ADAMS, 1937        
With its exotic blend of parchment, bronze, rust, rose, and oxblood, this intriguing iris adds a note of “unusual warmth and vibrancy” (Schreiner’s, 1946) to the early summer garden. Bred in Elkhart, Indiana, it was named for the British head gardener who helped create one of the 20th century’s greatest gardens, Hidcote. 38-46”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in spring 2014. We plan to offer it again in 2018. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
GREAT LAKES, 1938        
There’s a lot more to this iris than a great name. It’s Canadian-bred, so you know it’s tough, its stems are tall and sturdy, and its profuse, handsome flowers seem to reflect the summer sky. Winner of the Dykes Medal, it was “unquestionably the finest of all blue iris” for decades (Wayside, 1954). With a fragrance that’s been compared to magnolias, 36-40”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in spring 2016. We’re building up stock and will offer it again sometime in the future. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
HER MAJESTY, 1903        
This pixie queen is an “exquisite shade of lilac-pink, almost old rose” (The Garden Magazine, 1917), but what really sets it apart is the rich tapestry of deeper rose that ornaments its falls. Plant it where you can enjoy that exquisite detailing up close, or pick lots of bouquets! Fragrant, 24-26”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in spring 2016. We’re building up stock and will offer it again sometime in the future. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
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