Order these fall-planted bulbs NOW for delivery in OCTOBER and NOVEMBER.

ELEGANS ALBA, 1895        Rarest & Web-Only
Here’s a vanilla that’s far from plain – and deliciously fragrant! An ancestor of today’s lily-flowered tulips, it’s a Devon-cream colored, vase-shaped beauty with long slender petals that twist and reflex gently for an almost whirling effect. Aka ‘White Crown’, Cottage/Lily-flowered, 16”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC) from the Hortus Bulborum. See our other unusually fragrant tulips. Chart and care.
TU-67
1/$9.50
3/$26
5/$41
10/$76
Limit 10, please.
ELEGANS RUBRA, 1872        Rarest
With its almost savage beauty, this bright, dagger-petaled tulip was listed as a wild species in 19th-century catalogs. It’s never been found in the wild, though, and may be a survivor from the early 1700s when tulips much like it (and T. acuminata) ruled in the lavish gardens of the Ottoman Empire. Whatever its origins, it’s spectacular! Lily-flowered, 16”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Chart and care.
TU-81
3/$10
5/$16
10/$29.50
25/$67.50
50/$125
ELIAS MARTIN, 1956        Rarest & Web-Only
With its ruffled, flame-shaped petals of soft peach, yellow, and rose, this enchanting mid-century double looks almost like a pastel spring campfire. It’s named for an 18th-century Swedish artist famed for his romantic landscape paintings, and I bet he would have liked this painterly and romantic tulip. Double Early, 10-12”, zones 4b-7a(8aWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Chart and care.
TU-912
3/$12.50
5/$20
Limit 5, please.
ELSIE ELOFF, 1949        Rarest & It’s Back!
This is not your ordinary yellow tulip! Variously described as “primrose-ivory” and “pale butter yellow,” this ethereal flower glows like moonlight in the garden. It combines beautifully with everything from lilacs to ‘Black Parrot’ to the first blooms of iris season, and if you’re like us, once you’ve tried it you’ll never want to garden without it. Single Late, 26-30”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.
TU-923
5/$10
10/$19
25/$43
50/$80
Limit 50, please.
ESTELLA RIJNVELD, 1954        
“Like raspberry-ripple ice cream,” says Anna Pavord in The Tulip, and “one of the best.” It’s also one of the most dramatic of modern parrots, with a whirling-dervish intensity that rivals that of much older parrots such as ‘Amiral de Constantinople’. I first grew ‘Estella’ 25 years ago, and the outrageous beauty of its first blooms still blazes in my memory. Aka ‘Gay Presto’, parrot, 18-20”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.
TU-919
5/$9.50
10/$18
25/$41
50/$76
100/$141
FEU ARDENT, 1906        Rarest & Web-Only
It’s Back! “An old friend, entrancing in its rich brownish scarlet tints,” wrote famed plantsman J. Horace McFarland in 1927 of this once highly fashionable tulip. Although first offered about 1906, it was originally one of 400 “breeder” or self-colored tulips in the fabulous collection of Vincent van der Vinne which was sold at auction in 1863. Dutch Breeder/Single Late, 22-24”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Chart and care.
TU-939
1/$10
3/$27.50
5/$43
Limit 5, please.
T. sylvestris, FLORENTINE TULIP, 1597        
This violet-scented wildflower has small, yellow, almond-shaped flowers that nod in bud and then open wide in the sun. Gerard pictured it in his great Herbal of 1597, Jefferson grew it at Monticello, and it’s naturalized almost like a weed throughout Pennsylvania Dutch country — and our garden. Aka T. florentina, 8-14”, zones 5a-8a(8bWC), from Holland. See our other unusually fragrant tulips. Chart and care.
TU-12
5/$9
10/$17
25/$39
50/$72
100/$133
GARDEN PARTY, 1944        
This award-winning classic gets rosier and more vibrant every day, and its thick petals make it long-lasting in bloom, so you get more beauty from every bulb. It looks especially good mingled with whites and purples – a tip from English garden maven Rosemary Verey. Triumph, 16-18”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.
TU-947
5/$9
10/$17
25/$39
50/$72
100/$133
GENERAAL DE WET, 1904        
Richly fragrant and long-lived, ‘Generaal de Wet’ is a worthy scion of the legendary ‘Prince of Austria’. Although orange may not be traditional or expected in the spring garden, try a few bulbs of ‘De Wet’ and we think you’ll agree that its sunny, fresh, juicy tones look right at home there. Pair it with dark purple johnny-jump-ups outside and in a vase where you can enjoy its fragrance up close. Ahhhh! Single Early, 14”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Holland. See our other unusually fragrant tulips. Chart and care.
TU-14
5/$13
10/$24.50
25/$56
50/$104
100/$193
GENERAL NEY, 1837        Rarest & Web-Only
It’s Back! A bit dazed after looking at row after row of antique tulips, I snapped to attention when ‘General Ney’ caught my eye. It’s decidedly different, a rich dark cordovan — or port? mahogany? — that glows with intensity. Its old-fashioned, globular shape sets it apart, too. Exceptionally rare, it’s named for the inspiring leader that Napolean called “the bravest of the brave.” Dutch Breeder/Single Late, 18-20”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Chart and care.
TU-88
1/$9.50
3/$26
5/$41
Limit 5, please.
Page 4 of Tulips
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