Throughout our site, these treasures are highlighted with a green or purple bar and the word Rarest. Most you can’t get anywhere else in North America, and the rest you’d be very hard-pressed to find. That makes them extra-endangered — and extra-exciting in the garden.

CAPITALS indicate bulbs that are new or returned to our catalog after a hiatus.


Rarest for FALL 2017 Planting
Anne Frank, 1959 – with a vibrant heart, like Anne herself
April Queen, 1938 – bright, flame-kissed cup
Brilliancy, 1906 – luminous Arts-and-Crafts-era beauty
Broughshane, 1938 – amber-white Irish trumpet
Butter and Eggs, 1777 – the classic cottage-garden double
Conspicuus, 1869 – Victorian butterflies
Croesus, 1912 – gold and silver coins
Daphne, 1914 – ADS 2008 Best Historic Daffodil
Early Pearl, 1899 – early, fragrant, and luminous
Firebrand, 1897 – long creamy petals, fiery heart
Firetail, 1910 – is its cup truly RED?
Glory of Lisse, 1901 – one of the finest poets
Golden Spur, 1885 – extra-early Victorian trumpet
Henry Irving, 1885 – from Keukenhof’s parterre
Horace, 1894 – poet of carpe diem
Horn of Plenty, 1947 – long, dramatic bells
Insulinde, 1921 – graceful, exuberant double
Jenny, 1943 – like miniature shooting stars
John Evelyn, 1920 – Copeland’s best?
Keats, 1968 – the weirdest daffodil we’ve ever grown
King Alfred, 1899 – true stock!
Louise de Coligny, 1940 – sweet-scented apricot beauty
Lucifer, 1890 – heavenly wings, devilish cup
Maximus, Trumpet Major, 1576 – loved for over 400 years!
moschatus, 1604 – demurely nodding “Swan’s Neck”
Niveth, 1931 – Thalia’s elegant, uptown cousin
Polar Ice, 1936 – too good to let go
Princeps, 1830 – graceful white and yellow wildling
Romance, 1959 – our most richly colored “pink”
Rose of May, 1950 – rose-like shape and fragrance
Stilton, 1909 – from the Golden Age of pheasant’s-eyes
Sulphur Phoenix, Codlins and Cream, 1820 – Butter and Egg’s cousin
Twink, 1925 – a classic southern double
Vireo, 1962 – the jonquil named for a green songbird
White Lady, 1897 – Victorian lady with a parasol
antique freesia, 1878 – super fragrant naturalizer
Byzantine gladiolus, 1629 – true stock!
Marie, 1860 – deepest indigo-purple
Roman Blue, 1562 – wildflowery, and it multiplies!
Roman Pink, 1573 – wildflowery, pink, and wonderful
Roman White, 1597 – the rarest Roman of all
Vuurbaak, 1948 – deepest rose
fern-leaf peony, 1765 – thread-like foliage, extra early
Absalon, 1780 – chocolate and chestnut on gold
Bacchus Bontlof, 1890 – wavy, cream-edged leaves
Black and White, 1920 – dark flames on creamy white
Blondine, 1956 – Do blondes really have more fun?
Bridesmaid, 1900 – slender cherry and ivory flame
Cerise Gris-de-Lin, 1860 – rose, fawn and chocolate
Clara Butt, 1889 – once the world’s favorite
clusiana, 1607 – original WHITE & red
Columbine, 1929 – purple, lace-like tracery
Cottage Boy, 1906 – spirited and painterly
Demeter, 1932 – returns for years, vibrant rosy purple
Dillenburg, 1916 – wonderfully fragrant
Dom Pedro, 1906 – “undoubtedly the most attractive” brown tulip
Duchesse de Parma, 1820 – much more than red and yellow
Duc van Tol Red and Yellow, 1595 – ancient, landmark miniature
Duc van Tol Rose, 1700 – tiny pink and white ballerina
Elegans Alba, 1895 – fragrant vanilla
Elegans Rubra, 1872 – stark simplicity
Elsie Eloff, 1949 – pale butter yellow
Feu Ardent, 1906 – “entrancing brown,” much older than 1906
Insulinde, 1914 – enjoy its enchanting transformation
James Wild, 1890 – gloriously amber-brown
Jules Favres, 1913 – fiery chestnut-bronze
Koh-I-Noor, 1895 – dark, smoldering ruby
Lac van Rijn, 1620 – ancient crown of purple-red and ivory
Mabel, 1856 – barmaid’s delight?
Madras, 1913 – golden-bronze and fragrant
Mirella, 1953 – buff-rose and silvery pink
Old Times, 1905 – “garnet and primrose”
Philippe de Comines, 1891 – dark mahogany
Prince Albert, 1863 – lavender, pearl, and exceedingly rare
Prince of Austria, 1860 – fragrant and enduring
Princess Elizabeth, 1898 – “rose-pink with topaz lights”
Silver Standard, 1760 – dazzling red on white
The Lizard, 1903 – weird name, cool flower
Vulcan, 1913 – ruddy relic named for . . . Spock?
Willemsoord, 1930 – double, ruffled, carmine-rose and pearl
Willem van Oranje, 1933 – Renoir coppery-peach
Zomerschoon, 1620 – true relic of Tulipomania
You might also like to check out our Customer Favorites, Web-Only bulbs, New This Year bulbs, and Back Soon or Lost Forever bulbs.
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