OLA KALA, 1949        
The deep, warm, radiant yellow of this Dykes Medal winner continues to astonish gardeners nearly 70 years after it was first introduced by Jacob Sass of Nebraska. Its beards are orange, its tall stalks never topple, and it multiplies vigorously. In short, as its Greek name declares, it’s “all good.” 36-38”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in spring 2013. We offer a rotating selection of iris. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
PERFECTION, 1880        
“Well named,” wrote Nebraska nurseryman Charles Harrison in 1916, “tall and queenly, with a profusion of bloom of radiant and glistening purple.” Nearly a century later, iris expert Mike Unser agrees, saying ‘Perfection’ is “true to its name . . . with exceptional color, flawless form, vigorous growth” and even “beautiful foliage.” Flaring falls and splashes of darker purple on its standards add to its appeal. Due to limited space in our micro-farms, we’re offering it one time only, so get it while you can! 28-34”, zones 3-8a(10bWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in 2016. We offer a rotating selection of iris. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
PLUMERI, 1888        
This fragrant little iris is a fascinating mix of jewel-like colors that photos can only hint at. “Coppery rose” over “velvety claret” is how the legendary Bertrand Farr described it in 1920, while other have called it “rosy mauve with metallic sheen” over “red-violet, edged gold-brown.” Early and free flowering, it’s an iris we look forward to every year. (Please note: Recent research by Anner Whitehead has convinced us that ‘Plumeri’ dates to 1888, not 1830.) 28-32”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in 2017. We hope to offer this variety again next spring. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
PRINZESS VIKTORIA LUISE, 1910        
This radiant little iris won my heart long before I learned its name. A new neighbor rescued a single rhizome from the shade of overgrown shrubs, and before long it had multiplied into a big clump of one of the most beautiful iris I’d ever seen. Blooming abundantly, it has luminous, pale yellow standards over bright, rosy purple falls for an effect that’s absolutely scintillating. 20-24”, zones 3a-8a(10bWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in 2017. We offer a rotating selection of iris. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
QUEEN OF MAY, 1859        
One of the first “pink” irises, this Victorian favorite isn’t really pink but a soft, luminous, rosy lavender that’s distinctly different from the many lavender-blues of iris season. It’s fragrant, free-flowering, and still – as Ella McKinney summed it up in her 1927 Iris in the Little Garden – “old, early, and good.” 28-32”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in 2017. We offer a rotating selection of iris. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
ROSY WINGS, 1934        
Praised as “a delightful fantasy of colors” by the 1946 Schreiner’s catalog, this Dykes Medal winner is an ever-changing mix of iridescent bronze and old rose shading into deep russet and maroon. It’s remarkably tough and vigorous, too. As expert Winifred Ross wrote, “Once you have ‘Rosy Wings’, you always have it.” Lightly fragrant, 36-40”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in spring 2014. We don’t expect to offer it again but could special order it for you.
SHAH JEHAN, 1932        
“Opulent”, “gorgeous”, “magnificent”, “an extravaganza of color” — iris lovers for decades have been babbling about the breath-taking beauty of “this jewel among irises.” A spectacular blend of champagne, gold, chestnut, and an unbelievably rich, velvety plum, it’s well named for the great Mughal emperor who built 777 gardens — and the Taj Mahal. Grow it yourself and we bet you’ll soon be babbling about it, too! 36-40”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in 2014. We hope to offer this variety again next spring. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
SHANNOPIN, 1940        
Grown by author Vita Sackville-West at Sissinghurst – one of the 20th century’s most iconic gardens – this pastel beauty was bred by T. Lloyd Pillow, superintendent of Pittsburgh’s Street and Sewer Department. On tall, strong stems, its primrose-and-cream standards over old-rose, almost-pink falls make it an iris that our garden visitors always notice and admire. 38-42”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in 2016. We offer a rotating selection of iris. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
SUSAN BLISS, 1922        
The finest “pink” iris of the early 20th century, this lilac-rose beauty first sold for an unheard-of $75 each. For decades it was widely-praised for its “perfect form” (Wayman), “robust constitution” (Puget Sound), “freedom of flowering” (Hellings), and “appealing creamy pink tone” (Mead) which “blends well with almost any color” (Peckham) – and that’s all still true today. 30-34”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in spring 2016. We don’t expect to offer it again but could special order it for you.
THE RED DOUGLAS, 1937        
The “sterling, gorgeously rich, deep dark” colors of this Dykes Medal winner (to quote the 1946 Schreiner’s catalog) are made even more beautiful by the “rich plush-like quality” of its petals. Bred by Jacob Sass of Nebraska, it was named for medieval Scotland’s powerful Earls of Angus. Due to limited space in our micro-farms, we’re offering it one time only, so get it while you can! 34-36”, zones 3-8a(10bWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in spring 2016. Unfortunately due to our limited growing space, we don’t expect to offer it again. Sorry!
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