Order these fall-planted bulbs NOW for delivery in OCTOBER and NOVEMBER.

GOLDEN HARVEST, 1928        Rarest & Web-Only
Cottage tulips were bred from ancient survivors collected from English country gardens in the late 1800s. ‘Golden Harvest’ is one of the loveliest, a soft, lemon yellow so dewy fresh that we would have named it ‘Spring Dawn’. Its excellence as a cut-flower – long-lasting, strong-stemmed, and harmonious – has preserved it. Cottage/Single Late, 26”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.
TU-43
3/$9
5/$14.50
10/$27
25/$61
Limit 25, please.
INSULINDE, 1914        Rarest & Web-Only
Did you see this knockout in The New York Times? Like a sunrise in slow motion, it opens with baby-smooth, pale yellow petals feathered with rose, and then day by day it transforms itself into a big, ruffled flower of creamy white flamed with purple. You will be enchanted! True broken tulip, late-blooming, 16-18”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Chart and care.
TU-72
1/$12.50
3/$34
5/$54
10/$100
25/$225
Limit 25, please.
JAMES WILD, 1890        Rarest
Brown? You bet! And it’s fabulous. This is the unbroken, Breeder form of a tulip which may be better known in its broken, mahogany-on-gold Bizarre form. Although its broken version is flashier, this anything-but-plain brown tulip – with its shades of coffee, bronze, and amber – needs no improvement. Single Late, 18-20”, zones 4a-7a(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. See our other brown tulips. Chart and care.
TU-70
1/$7.50
3/$20.50
5/$32.50
10/$60
25/$135
JULES FAVRES, 1913        Rarest & Web-Only
It's Back! Named for a fiery French statesman, this “handsome flower” is “bright chestnut-bronze with golden-bronze margin and bronze-black center,” to quote the 1931 catalog of London’s Barr and Sons. It’s also one of the rarest tulips we’re offering this year – the Hortus has promised us just 25 bulbs – so if you want it, don’t delay! Dutch Breeder/Single Late, 24-28”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Chart and care.
TU-937
1/$9.50
3/$26
5/$41
10/$76
Limit 10, please.
KEIZERSKROON, 1750        
An affordable 18th-century antique, “Emperor’s Crown” is still “magnificent for any purpose,” as C.S. Allen wrote in his 1893 best-seller, Bulbs and Tuberous Rooted Plants. Counterfeits are rife today, but our bulbs are the real deal. You’ll even see them blooming at Mount Vernon! Single Early, 13”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.
TU-16
5/$9.50
10/$18
25/$41
50/$76
100/$141
KINGSBLOOD, 1952        
Red is the most traditional, iconic color in tulips, and ‘Kingsblood’ is one of the 20th century’s finest, most enduring reds. Tall, late-blooming, and stately, it’s drop-dead gorgeous interplanted with ‘Greuze’, or sprinkle a few among pastel tulips to add a bit of visual zest, like the maraschino cherries in the fruit cocktail your grandmother used to serve. Single Late, 22-24”, zones 3a-7b(8bWC), from Holland. Chart and care.
TU-962
5/$6.50
10/$12.50
25/$28
50/$52
100/$96
KOH-I-NOOR, 1895        Rarest & Web-Only
A deep, smoldering ruby that’s so dark it’s just not right to call it red, ‘Koh-I-Noor’ brings a touch of midnight and mystery to the spring garden. Even its shape is unusual – spade-like petals opening into an angular crown. It’s named for one of history’s largest and most celebrated diamonds, the 700-year-old “Mountain of Light,” now part of England’s Crown Jewels. 10-12”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Chart and care.
TU-981
1/$10.50
3/$28.50
5/$45
Limit 5, please.
LAC VAN RIJN, 1620        Rarest
A very rare survivor from the days of Tulipomania in the 1630s, this crown-shaped tulip of burgundy and ivory was once sold for enormous sums. Today it may still seem expensive – but what else can you own from 1620 that costs so little? And with good care, it multiplies! Pronounced “Lock von Rhine,” Single Early, 14”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Chart and care.
TU-01
1/$6.50
3/$18
5/$28
10/$52
25/$117
MABEL, 1856        Rarest
With bold flames and feathers of cherry-red on white, this striking English florists’ tulip was bred by a Lancashire weaver over 150 years ago. But who was Mabel? Wife? Daughter? Or maybe a favorite barmaid at one of the pubs where the tulip societies held their shows back then? True broken tulip, multiplies well, late blooming, 18”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Chart and care.
TU-75
1/$7
3/$19
5/$30
10/$56
25/$126
MADRAS, 1913        Rarest & Web-Only
One of the break-out stars from our former Brown Sugar sampler, this “handsome Old Dutch Tulip,” to quote the Barr and Sons catalog of 1931, is “golden-bronze, the outer petals being flushed plum” – and it’s fragrant. Although it was officially introduced in 1913, Wister says it was listed by Krelage as far back as 1870. Dutch Breeder/Single Late, 22-26”, zones 4a-7b(8bWC), from the Hortus Bulborum. Chart and care.
TU-931
1/$9.50
3/$26
5/$41
10/$76
Limit 10, please.
Page 5 of Tulips
  << Previous  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8  Next >>
Loading