LAVANESQUE, 1960        
‘Lavanesque’ takes its name from a popular perfume introduced in the 1950s that ads claimed “speaks for the secret and reckless heart.” But even if you don’t have a reckless heart, we bet you’ll like this romantic glad from the Mad-Men era with its lightly ruffled, not-too-big blossoms of rosy-lavender and cream. 4 feet, from Maine. Last offered in spring 2011. We hope to offer it again someday. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
LITTLE MO, 1966        
From the psychedelic ’60s, this small-flowered cutie is vivid coral-orange with a scarlet blaze at the throat for added zing. With as many as 22 buds per stem, it was a top show-winner for decades, but we think it’s a lot happier out in the garden where it mingles easily with perennials. 3 feet, from Maine. Last offered web-only in spring 2007. We may offer it again periodically.
MARY HOUSLEY, 1951        
Rosy embers glow in the hearth of this cream-colored gladiolus, recalling the painted-lady patterns of Victorian glads. Antique-plant maven Roy Genders called it “most pretty” and we agree! 4 feet, from Holland. Last offered in spring 2008. We may offer it again someday.
MELODIE, 1955        
As featured in both Garden Gate and The Old-House Journal! Small-flowered and richly patterned, this little gem is very much like the rococo glads of the late 1800s. Rosy-peach with a blaze of scarlet and gold — one stem in a bud vase is all you’ll need. 3 feet, from Maine. Last offered in spring 2016. Although we hope to offer this rare glad for spring 2017 delivery, availability can’t be confirmed until January. Please check back then or subscribe to our newsletter for an alert.
MEXICANA, 1967        
Wildly ruffled – like skirts swirling at a fiesta – this complex and exuberant glad is soft spring green blended with cream and buff and highlighted at the throat with a dramatic lacework of red. We like to combine it in bouquets with ‘Spic and Span’ and ‘Fidelio’, or try it with warm-colored dahlias such as ‘Golden Heart’, ‘David Howard’, and ‘Bishop of Llandaff’. ¡Olé! 4 feet, from a sunny clearing deep in the woods of Maine. Last offered in spring 2016. Although we hope to offer this rare glad for spring 2017 delivery, availability can’t be confirmed until January. Please check back then or subscribe to our newsletter for an alert.
G. dalenii, PARROT GLAD, 1830        
The first African glad in US gardens, this vivid orange, green, and yellow wildling was eventually crowded aside by new hybrids. But it lingered in old Southern gardens, waiting to be rediscovered by savvy 21st-century gardeners. “The most desirable,” Bridgeman wrote in 1837. “It blossoms freely, and the colors are exquisitely beautiful.” As usual, our supply this spring is VERY limited. Formerly G. psittacinus and G. natalensis, zones 8a-9b(11bWC), 4 feet tall, from Louisiana. Last offered in spring 2015. Although we hope to offer this rare glad for spring 2017 delivery, availability can’t be confirmed until January. Please check back then or subscribe to our newsletter for an alert.
SILVER DOLLAR, 1962        
“It’s like a string of pearls,” says our usually matter-of-fact Maine grower of this pure white classic – “the ideal wedding glad.” 4 feet, from Maine. Last offered web-only in spring 2007. We may offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
SNOW PRINCESS, 1939        
Now that ‘White Friendship’ and ‘White Goddess’ have gone commercially extinct, we’re happier than ever to have this snowy-white Depression-era beauty with its intriguing pink anthers. One of the oldest traditional glads we’ve ever offered, it was a florists’ favorite for decades and long praised as “sturdy,” “stately,” and “exquisite.” 4½ feet tall, from Maine. Last offered in spring 2016. Although we hope to offer this rare glad for spring 2017 delivery, availability can’t be confirmed until January. Please check back then or subscribe to our newsletter for an alert.
SPIC AND SPAN, 1946        
This luscious coral glad is named for the popular household cleanser that dates back to Depression days. It’s the top blue-ribbon winning glad of all time and a personal favorite of our good customer and celebrated Atlanta garden designer, Ryan Gainey. 4 feet, Holland. Last offered in spring 2016. Unfortunately ‘Spic and Span’ seems to have gone “commercially extinct,” although you may find impostors sold elsewhere. We’ll continue searching for true stock, and announce any success in our newsletter. Please keep your fingers crossed!
SUNBONNET SUE, 1967        
Named for the traditional quilt pattern of little girls in over-sized bonnets, this pastel glad is a warm apricot-buff with a sprinkling of freckles in its golden throat. Customers at our local Farmers Market loved it as a cutflower, and it’s even better when you grow your own! Small-flowered, 3-4 feet, from Maine. Last offered in spring 2016. Although we hope to offer this rare glad for spring 2017 delivery, availability can’t be confirmed until January. Please check back then or subscribe to our newsletter for an alert.
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