PARI TAHA SUNRISE, 1957        
Hot and bright, this dazzling dahlia is the garden equivalent of those Fourth of July sparklers you loved as a kid. Its petals are exclamation points of brilliant yellow flamed with red. Bred in New Zealand, its Maori name means “cliff’s-edge sunrise.” 4-6” 4’, from Oregon. Last offered in 2006. Available elsewhere.
POPULAR GUEST, 1957        
Fringed dahlias like this glamorous lavender beauty are called “laciniated” in the US, “fimbriated” in England, but the French say it best: dentelle or lace-work dahlias. They first came into vogue in the ‘50s, and ‘Popular Guest’ – with its echoes of Sputnik lamps and starburst Formica – has a mid-century vibe that’s enduringly cool. 4-6”, 4-5’, from Holland. Last offered in 2016. We may offer it again someday.
PRINCESSE LOUISE DE SUEDE, 1947        
Chic, sophisticated ‘Princess Louise of Sweden’ offers 4-inch flowers of a tantalizing color that’s hard to describe: maybe frosted coral? It’s not orange, not pink, not rose, but if you blended all three together and added a bit of mist, you’d be close. For added elegance, its petal tips seem dipped in silver, more on some flowers, less on others. Very cool! 4 inches, 4 feet, from Holland. Unfortunately this unique dahlia multiplies so slowly that it was one of our “last chance” dahlias in spring 2016, and we’re not planning to offer it again.
PRINSES BEATRIX, 1939        
Improbably beautiful, ‘Prinses B’ combines unusual colors in dramatic flowers that we get all ga-ga about here. Opening golden-orange tipped white with peachy centers, they mature to pale, pale pink edged with orange-gold. Though it may sound weird, it’s oh-my-gosh lovely. Our photo can only hint at it! 4-5” 4-5’, from Oregon. Last offered in spring 2004. We’ve lost our entire stock but we hope to offer it again someday.
PRINZESSIN IRENE VON PREUSSEN, 1912        
We rediscovered ‘Prinzessin Irene’ in Germany and fell in love at first bloom. With a heart of gold and fewer, longer petals than most modern dahlias, it has a serene, languid look that’s charmingly antique. Try it paired with soul-mate ‘Jersey’s Beauty’ – ahhhhh! Formal decorative, 4-5”, 4-5’, from Holland. Last offered in 2016. We’re building up stock and plan to offer it again sometime in the future. Please subscribe to our newsletter for an alert when we do.
PROMISE, 1959        
This frilled, award-winning, mid-century classic is a soft pastel yellow that has great carrying power in the garden. It’s also a fine flower for bouquets, where its delicately fringed tips make for an almost sparkling effect. It’s strong growing and floriferous, with 4-5” laciniated flowers on 4-5’ plants, from Holland. This was one of our “last chance” dahlias in spring 2013, and we’re not planning to offer it again. Sorry!
RED KAISER WILHELM, 1881?        
Glowing like neon, this mutant twin of the great ‘Kaiser Wilhelm’ looks ready for a night of cabaret-hopping. Despite its name, it’s not red but a deep, deep rose on white that’s so vivid it almost buzzes. 3”, 4-5’, from Oregon. This was one of our “last chance” dahlias in spring 2013, and we’re not planning to offer it again. Sorry!
ROMANCE, 1945        
A perfect Valentine’s Day dahlia (if only dahlias bloomed then!), ‘Romance’ has gracefully curving petals of rosy pink tipped with silver and a heart of French vanilla. It’s a great size for bouquets, and exquisite with our ‘Pearl’ double tuberoses. 3-4” 4’, from Oregon. Last offered in 2006. Available elsewhere.
SELLWOOD GLORY, 1951        
Dramatic ‘Sellwood Glory’ is an almost black and white ensemble of silvery petals thickly brushed with deep, dark raisin-purple. Though it hails originally from the historic Sellwood neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, it had all but disappeared from US gardens till we reintroduced it from the British National Collection in 2008. (Read its full story here.) Formal decorative, 8-10”, 3-4’, from Oregon. We hope to have more ‘Sellwood Glory’ to offer soon. Please check back or subscribe to our newsletter for an alert.
SHERWOOD’S PEACH, 1944        
Up to a foot across, with ruffled petals of copper, amber, and bronze, ‘Sherwood’s Peach’ may remind you of a mellow, rising, autumn sun. One bloom in a Rookwood bowl on an old oak table is sheer bliss. But caution: this is our latest-blooming dahlia, so you’ll need a long growing season to enjoy it. 4-5’, from Oregon. Last offered in spring 2009. Available elsewhere.
Page 3 of Dahlias: Lost?
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