HER MAJESTY, 1903        
This pixie queen is an “exquisite shade of lilac-pink, almost old rose” (The Garden Magazine, 1917), but what really sets it apart is the rich tapestry of deeper rose that ornaments its falls. Plant it where you can enjoy that exquisite detailing up close, or pick lots of bouquets! Fragrant, 24-26”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in 2016. We offer a rotating selection of iris. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
INDIAN CHIEF, 1929        
With velvety, wine-red falls and glowing standards of raspberry to bronze, this tall, striking, Jazz Age iris is one of the most colorful we grow. It’s exceptionally vigorous, too, thriving on neglect in old gardens everywhere and blooming even in part shade. By the good Dr. Wylie Ayres of Cincinnati, 32-36”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in 2017. We hope to offer this variety again in 2020. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
LAVANDULACEA, 1854        
Subtle and small-flowered, this rarely offered beauty will never be mistaken for a modern iris. It’s an intriguing blend of soft lavender shaded at the edges by even softer brown – yes, brown! – and brightened by a glow in the center that spills out on its golden beards. Due to limited space in our micro-farms, we’re offering it one time only, so get it while you can! Aka ‘Dove’, ‘Agnes Sorrel’, ‘Pluton’, ‘Rosamond’, and ‘Candicans’. 22-26”, zones 3-8a(10bWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in 2016. We offer a rotating selection of iris. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
LORELEY, 1909        
Named for the golden-haired siren of the Rhine, this quirky flower was one of the most popular iris of the early 20th century. Its glowing, primrose-to-amber standards are held in an open, goblet-like form, and they’re often splashed with bits of the richly veined violet of the falls – two “imperfections” that somehow only add to its enduring appeal. By Germany’s Goos and Koenemann, 22-26”, zones 3a-8a(10bWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in 2018. We hope to offer this variety again in 2020. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
MADAME CHEREAU, 1844        
The most sought-after iris of the 19th century, ‘Mme. Chereau’ is tall, stately, and oh so lovely. Its elegantly long white petals are neatly stitched or feathered with purple along the edges in a pattern known as plicata. A truly landmark iris, it was bred by pioneering nurseryman Jean-Nicolas Lémon whose 150 dazzling introductions transformed iris from a wildflower into a garden superstar. Grape-scented, 36”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in 2013. We offer a rotating selection of iris. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
MRS. HORACE DARWIN, 1888        
The violet reticulations on this elegant, not-so-big iris make it even more beautiful up close – and great for bouquets. Named for the wife of one of Darwin’s sons, it’s an enduring survivor by Sir Michael Foster “whose name shines more luminously than any other in the early history of garden iris” (Mahan, Classic Iris). Fragrant, 24-26”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in 2018. We hope to offer this variety again in 2020. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
NEGLECTA, 1813        
Although named in 1813, this wild hybrid of I. pallida and I. variegata was probably grown in gardens long before that. Today several similar clones are grouped under this name, all short and small-flowered with pale lavender standards over jaunty little falls that are richly veined with purple – and as the Biltmore Nursery catalog noted in 1912, “most desirable.” Due to limited space in our micro-farms, we’re offering this wild jewel one time only, so get it while you can! 20-14”, zones 3-8a(10bWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in 2016. We offer a rotating selection of iris. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
OLA KALA, 1949        
The deep, warm, radiant yellow of this Dykes Medal winner continues to astonish gardeners nearly 70 years after it was first introduced by Jacob Sass of Nebraska. Its beards are orange, its tall stalks never topple, and it multiplies vigorously. In short, as its Greek name declares, it’s “all good.” 36-38”, zones 3a-8a(10aWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in 2013. We don’t expect to offer it again but could special order it for you.
PERFECTION, 1880        
“Well named,” wrote Nebraska nurseryman Charles Harrison in 1916, “tall and queenly, with a profusion of bloom of radiant and glistening purple.” Nearly a century later, iris expert Mike Unser agrees, saying ‘Perfection’ is “true to its name . . . with exceptional color, flawless form, vigorous growth” and even “beautiful foliage.” Flaring falls and splashes of darker purple on its standards add to its appeal. Due to limited space in our micro-farms, we’re offering it one time only, so get it while you can! 28-34”, zones 3-8a(10bWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in 2016. We offer a rotating selection of iris. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
PINNACLE, 1949        
“Fresh, cool, flawless in its purity, and absolutely unique,” to quote its breeder Jean Stevens, ‘Pinnacle’ was a ground-breaking iris, the first to combine white standards with yellow falls. It soon became immensely popular, too, and experts say it would have won the Dykes Medal – if only New Zealand-bred iris had been eligible for it. 36-40”, zones 3a-8a(10bWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in 2018 and we don't expect to offer it again.
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