LOUISE RUSSELL, 1959        
At just two feet tall, this abundantly blooming, mid-century pink is perfect for small gardens or the front of the border. It’s a soft peachy pink with a lemon yellow throat, as cool and summery as pink lemonade pie. 18-24”, mid to late-mid, dormant, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from Missouri. Last offered in spring 2015. We plan to offer it again periodically. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
LUXURY LACE, 1959        
When we asked the experts, this pastel gem topped the list of heirloom daylilies we just had to offer. Its pale, melon-pink color was an exciting advance for the 1950s, and – enhanced by a cool green throat – it’s still exciting and lovely today. Winner of the Stout Medal, it was bred by Edna Spalding of rural Louisiana who grew her seedlings in the vegetable garden and culled the rejects with a kitchen knife. 32”, mid-summer blooming, dormant, zones 4a-8b(10bWC), from Missouri. Last offered in spring 2015. We plan to offer it again periodically. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
PAINTED LADY, 1942        
“I may be old-fashioned,” writes daylily connoisseur Sydney Eddison, but this “big handsome daylily with flowers the color of orange marmalade is still a striking plant.” Others call its abundant flowers “bronze orange” or even “cinnamon,” but everyone seems to agree that this vigorous, drought-tolerant, Stout Medal winner is far from ordinary. 36” mid-summer blooming, evergreen in warm zones, zones 5a-8b(10aWC), from Missouri. Last offered in spring 2011. We may offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
PORT, 1941        
We love how profusely this charming little daylily blooms, and how its small, rusty red flowers glow warmly in the summer sun. Bred by the great A.B. Stout, it was named by globe-trotting “lady botanist” Mary Gibson Henry in memory of her youngest son, Porteous. 30-36”, early-mid to mid, semi-evergreen, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in spring 2015. We’re building up stock and plan to offer it again in the future. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
POTENTATE, 1943        
With its red-violet undertones, this Stout Medal winner was an exciting color advance for its time, and although no one today would describe it as “pansy purple,” it’s still a striking flower. And potent – it often develops small plantlets called proliferations on its bloom stalks which you can root and grow into new plants! 36-42”, mid to late-mid, dormant, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in spring 2015. We’re building up stock and plan to offer it again in the future. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
PRINCESS IRENE, 1952        
One of the latest, longest-blooming, and brightest daylilies we grow, ‘Princess Irene’ will draw you from across the garden with its joyful brilliance, from mid-summer well into fall. With its star-like form and almost wriggling petals, it’s the only daylily ever introduced by H. A. Zager of Des Moines – but he sure picked a winner. 28-34”, late-mid to late, dormant, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in spring 2015. We’re building up stock and plan to offer it again in the future. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
SOVEREIGN, 1906        
Small-flowered, early blooming, and one of the oldest daylilies of all, this cheery little queen is lemon yellow lightly shaded with chestnut on back. It was bred from the wild lemon lily and H. dumortierii by George Yeld, the founding father of daylilies, and it blooms today – as it has for decades – in the restored garden of Mississippi author Eudora Welty. Yellower and taller than its sibling ‘Gold Dust’, 28-30”, dormant, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in spring 2015. We’re building up stock and plan to offer it again in the future. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
THERON, 1934        
This rarely offered, landmark daylily was bred by A.B. Stout, the New York Botanic Garden scientist who unlocked the amazing potential of daylilies, setting them on the road to superstardom. Although Stout introduced 92 remarkable daylilies, he’s said to have been especially proud of ‘Theron’, whose mahogany blooms made it the first “red” daylily. 30”, mid-summer blooming, dormant, zones 4a-8b(10bWC), from Ann Arbor. Last offered in spring 2015. We’re building up stock and plan to offer it again in the future. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
VESPERS, 1941        
Unlike most daylilies that wane as night approaches, this pale yellow beauty opens late in the day and then stays fresh and beautiful all evening — when you’re home to enjoy it — and the following day. It was bred by the remarkable Elizabeth Nesmith who hybridized hundreds of daylilies, iris, and other perennials and sold them by mail, in an era when ladies just didn’t do things like that. Often reblooms, 34-38”, early-mid, zones 4a-8a(10aWC), from our Ann Arbor micro-farms. Last offered in spring 2015. Due to our very limited growing space, we may not offer it again – but if you’re dying to have it, please email us.
YELLOWSTONE, 1950        
What sets this mighty classic apart — and why should you give it a try? It’s more fragrant than its famous parent ‘Hyperion’. Its Chicago breeding makes it extra tough. And its lily-like, moonlight-yellow flowers stay open longer than most, making it especially beautiful in the evening garden — when you’ll be home to enjoy it. 36” mid-summer blooming, dormant, zones 4a-8b(9aWC), from Missouri. Last offered in spring 2011. We may offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
Page 2 of Daylilies: Lost?
  << Previous  1 2
Loading