EMPRESS, 1869        
One of the most popular daffodils of all time, this landmark beauty helped spark the modern world’s love affair with daffodils when it was introduced alongside ‘Emperor’ just after the Civil War. With pure white petals and a slender yellow trumpet, it’s dewy fresh and eternally regal. Our 2009 Bulb of the Year, 1 W-Y, 18-20”, zones 5a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Last offered web-only in 2012. We’ll offer it again as soon as bulbs are available. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
FEU DE JOIE, 1927        
Introduced at the height of the Roaring Twenties, this free-spirited flower combines a dozen long, wavy outer petals with a crinkled center of orange and gold. Pronounced fə də JWAH, it was bred by the master of doubles, William Copeland, and named for a celebratory rifle salute known as the “fire of joy.” 4 W-O, 18-20”, early-mid season, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2014. Our grower is increasing his stock and we’ll offer it again sometime in the future. For an alert, subscribe to our email newsletter.
FIREBIRD, 1940        
Star-like ‘Firebird’ lights up the spring garden with its long, graceful petals rippling out from a heart of fire. One of the rarest daffodils we’ve ever offered, it’s one of only four introduced by Mrs. F. Stuart Foote of Grand Rapids, Michigan, who’s also credited with prompting her furniture-mogul husband to make the worlds first coffee table. 3 W-O, 18-20”, late-mid season, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. In 2016 our expert Dutch grower told us that he’s convinced that this is actually the much older Firebrand.
FOLLY, 1926        
$50! At an ADS auction a couple of years ago, that was the winning bid for three bulbs of this vivid, sun-proof, blue-ribbon charmer that E.A. Bowles praised as the epitome of “brilliancy, gaiety, and refinement.” Though it’s definitely worth that much, you’ll note that we’re charging a LOT less. We really want you to grow it! 2 W-O, 18-20”, zones 5a-7b(9bWC), from Pennsylvania. Last offered in 2010. We may offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
GOLDEN SCEPTRE, 1914        
Sublimely fragrant, this tough, free-flowering jonquil “has settled into Southern life,” says Scott Ogden in Garden Bulbs for the South. In 1930, Philadelphia master horticulturist John Wister praised its toughness, saying it “stays in bloom sometimes for two to three weeks in spite of storms or hot weather.” 7 Y-Y, 18-20” early/mid-season blooming, zones 6a-8b(10bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2006. We could special order it for you.
GRAND MONARQUE, 1798        
Prized since the days of Napoleon, ‘Grand Monarque’ blooms in clusters of small, sweetly fragrant, white and yellow flowers. It’s “magnificent as grown on the Riviera and in Algiers,” E.A. Bowles reported in the early 1900s, and it’s especially favored today in the Mediterranean climates of the West Coast. 8 W-Y, 18-20”, zones 7b-9b(11bWC), from California. Last offered in 2005. We could special order it for you.
N. bulbocodium bulbocodium, HOOP PETTICOATS, 1629        
These odd little cuties are the true Southern heirloom, not Dutch look-alikes. With funnel-shaped cups and exclamation-point petals, they may remind you of cartoon characters. Short and early, they’re not easy to please but seem to do best in gritty acid soil that bakes in summer. 13 Y-Y, 8-10”, zones 6b-8bS(10bWC), from Texas. Last offered in 2009. We may offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
HORSFIELDII, 1845        
This very rare relic from the dawn of the Golden Age of daffodils was bred by Lancashire weaver John Horsefield (whose name lost an “e” when Latinized.) It was the Model T of daffodils, revealing their enormous potential, and as late as 1907 experts were still praising it as “grand and popular.” With white petals and a rich yellow trumpet, it’s sturdy, handsome, and still awesome. 1 W-Y, 14”, zones 5a-7b(9bWC), from Holland’s greatest daffodil collector. Last offered in 2012. We’ll offer it again as soon as bulbs are available. For an alert, sign up for our email newsletter.
ICE FOLLIES, 1953        
Winner of both the ADS’s highest honor, the Wister Award, and the Royal Horticultural Society’s AGM for “outstanding excellence,” this popular daffodil opens with a broad, ruffled, yellow cup that matures to almost white. It’s tough enough to naturalize along a highway yet beautiful enough to win a place in world-class gardens from Chanticleer to Filoli. 2 W-W, 20-24”, early-mid season, zones 4a-8b(10bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2015. Available elsewhere, or we could special order it for you.
INGLESCOMBE, 1912        
Lemon chiffon pie? The fresh, light color of this rare double is hard to describe but refreshingly different from the bright yellows and golds of most daffodils. It’s distinct in shape, too, a fluffy poof of a flower, relaxed yet never sloppy. Prepare to meet a real individual! 4 Y-Y, 16-18”, z. 4a-7b(9bWC), Holland. Last offered in 2014. Our grower is increasing his stock and we’ll offer it again sometime in the future. For an alert, subscribe to our email newsletter.
Page 2 of Daffodils: Lost?
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