STILTON, 1909        
Bred by Devonshire nurseryman E.B. Champernowne, the man who gave the world ‘Red Devon’, this much rarer daffodil survives from the Golden Age of pheasant’s-eyes. We have just 100 bulbs this year from one of Holland’s greatest daffodil collectors, and it could be years before he has any more to share with us, so get it while you can! 9 W-YYR, late blooming, 14-16”, zones 4a-7a(9bWC). With luck we will be able to offer this variety this fall. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
SULPHUR PHOENIX, CODLINS AND CREAM, 1820        
With white and pale yellow petals, this is the much rarer, towheaded cousin of ‘Butter and Eggs’ (aka ‘Golden Phoenix’) and ‘Eggs and Bacon’ (aka ‘Orange Phoenix’). “Very chaste and beautiful,” said the Barr and Sons catalog of 1907, “much prized for bouquets.” Its folk name refers to a dessert of coddled (gently stewed or baked) coddlins (green or cooking apples) served with sweet cream. Aka ‘Silver Phoenix’, 4 W-Y, mid-season blooming, 18-20”, zones 5b-8a(10aWC), from Holland. With luck we will be able to offer this variety this fall. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
SWANSDOWN, 1938        
As lovely as its name, this rare, creamy white double has a distinctive shape. Six single outer petals frame a short central rosette all ruffled and frilled like a tiny carnation. It was bred by one of the 20th-century’s greatest daffodil connoisseurs at Scotland’s romantic Brodie Castle, where you can still see it growing today. 4 W-W, 16-18”, zones 5a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2005. Unfortunately we’ve lost our grower and haven’t found another yet who can guarantee true stock. We’ll keep searching, though, and hope to offer it again soon. Stay tuned with our email newsletter.
SWEETNESS, 1939        
One of the first winners of the ADS’s top honor, the Wister Award, ‘Sweetness’ has been called “the best daffodil for the South” – and it’s just as good north through zone 6. It’s vigorous and refined, with a fluted cup, thick, weather-proof petals, and the fragrance of its jonquil ancestors. 7 Y-Y, 16-18”, zones 6a-8b(10bWC), from Holland. See all of our Wister Award-winners. Last offered in 2016. Our grower is increasing his stock and we hope to offer it again soon. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
N. x intermedius, TEXAS STAR, 1816        
An enduring, cottage-garden classic in the South, this tough little wildflower was once painted by Redouté for Napoleon’s garden-loving Empress Josephine. It’s a wild cross of N. jonquilla and N. tazetta – so of course it’s fragrant – and through the years its many names have included ‘Etoile d’Or’ and “the Cowslip Cupped.” 13 Y-Y, 16-18”, zones 6b-8b(10bWC), from Texas. Last offered in 2010. We may offer it again periodically, or we could special order it for you.
VERGER, 1930        
Since the Middle Ages, mace-carrying vergers have led the grandest processions, hence the name of this majestic daffodil which looks like a pheasant’s-eye but blooms weeks earlier. With stainless petals and a cup as brilliant as a cathedral window, it’s a daffodil to look forward to year after year after year. 3W-R, 18-20”, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2013.
VICTORIA, 1897        
Named for the Queen and “especially noted for its vanilla-like perfume,” this cream and gold Victorian trumpet was a favorite for decades in the flower markets of London (Kirby, 1909). Its petals are gracefully waved and its bright trumpet is richly frilled. In the 1920s, one bulb of ‘Victoria’ which bloomed with its trumpet split into strips became the beginning of modern split-corona daffodils. 1 W-Y, 18-20” early blooming, zones 5a-7b(9bWC) from Holland. Last offered in 2005. We lost our grower and haven’t found another who offers authentic stock.
VIREO, 1962        
“Nature’s first green is gold,” Robert Frost wrote, and it’s the vivid green deep in the cup of this great little jonquil that sets it apart, giving its lemony flowers a distinct, fresh, spring-time feeling. Named for a small olive-green songbird, it was bred by America’s greatest daffodil breeder, Grant Mitsch, who was also an avid birder. Last offered in 2009, 7Y-GYY, 9-12” very late blooming, zones 6a-8b(10bWC), from Holland. With luck we will be able to offer this variety this fall. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
WILL SCARLETT, 1898        
The brilliant color of this groundbreaking daffodil so dazzled the world when it was first introduced that three bulbs sold for £100 – the equivalent today of over $12,000. Its petals are notoriously unruly, but as William Arnold wrote in 1921, “though a somewhat loosely put together flower, [it] is nevertheless very handsome.” Bred by the illustrious Rev. Engleheart, it’s well named for the youngest of Robin Hood’s Merry Men who is often depicted wearing red silk. 2 W-O, 21-23”, late-mid season, zones 4a-7b(9bWC), from Holland. Last offered in 2013. Our grower is increasing his stock and we hope to offer it again soon. If you’d like to be notified the next time we offer this treasure, sign up for an email alert.
Page 6 of Daffodils: Lost?
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