Heirloom Bulbs & Garden History  •  So Much More Than New
August 2017
Aug
16
2017

“Magnificent, Almost Immortal” Peonies

“Magnificent, Almost Immortal” Peonies – www.OldHouseGardens.com
‘Prarie Afire’, 1932

If “a display of great big gorgeous flowers is what you are after,” writes Eleanor Perenyi in her timeless classic Green Thoughts (1981), “herbaceous peonies are my choice.”

Why? Unlike tree peonies, “herbaceous peonies stand straight and tall, don’t hide their heads, and are magnificent for cutting. They aren’t temperamental, deciding, for inscrutable reasons, to withhold their bloom for a year. They are almost immortal, even when hopelessly neglected in the backyards of old farms.” And although “all peonies suffer when a heavy rain hits them,” all they need is “a good shake to revive.”

As for fragrance, “peony scents vary greatly,” Perenyi notes, “from one so like a rose I couldn’t, in the dark, tell the difference, to an acrid sweetness not unlike the lilac’s. The doubles smell better than the singles and the herbaceous better than the tree peonies – to me.”

We’re offering more peonies than ever this fall, including four for the first time and four web-only. The only downside to this abundance is that ‘Shawnee Chief’ ended up all alone on the second page at our website. Don’t miss it – it’s superb.

“Magnificent, Almost Immortal” Peonies – www.OldHouseGardens.com
‘Miss America’, 1936
“Magnificent, Almost Immortal” Peonies – www.OldHouseGardens.com
‘Shawnee Chief’, 1940
“Magnificent, Almost Immortal” Peonies – www.OldHouseGardens.com

Read August’s News, Alerts, & Quotation.

Aug
9
2017

Transylvania Celebrates the Tuberose

Transylvania Celebrates the Tuberose – www.OldHouseGardens.com

Tourists poured into the Romanian village of Hoghilag this past weekend for the annual Tuberose Festival.

“Just as France has the lavender fields, Romania has the fields of tuberoses,” explains festival director Claudia-Romana Rista. “With a tradition of over 100 years in growing tuberoses, Hoghilag is called today the Land of Tuberoses.”

Located in the historic Transylvania Highlands, “the largest eco-touristic destination in Romania,” Hoghilag’s tuberose fields produce upwards of 150,000 bloom-stalks per acre. Some are sold as cut-flowers, but most are harvested for use in perfumes where, according to fragrantica.com, “no note is more surprisingly carnal, creamier, or contradicting.”

Festival activities include perfume workshops, flower cooking and jewelry-making classes, films, concerts, traditional foods, and a bicycle tour of the tuberose fields.

Learn more at Romania-Insider.com and the Hoghilag Facebook page – and to enjoy your own Backyard Tuberose Festival, order a few bulbs now for spring planting!

Read August’s News, Alerts, & Quotation.

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